Refine your search

Search Results

Here are the studies that match your search criteria. If you are interested in participating, please reach out to the contact listed for the study. If no contact is listed, contact us and we'll help you find the right person.

1 Study Matches

Impact of Racial Microaggressions on Outcomes in Pregnancy (MOP) Study

Black women are far more likely to have pregnancy-related complications and are at increased risk of dying before and after childbirth compared to white women. Several biopsychosocial factors contribute to this health disparity, and one potential contributor is racial microaggressions within the medical experiences of black women. Growing evidence highlights the negative effects of racial microaggressions on physical and mental health in black women yet little is known about these effects during pregnancy and prenatal care. Therefore, we will ask mothers aged 21 to 35 residing in the United States who gave birth to a single infant within the last three years to report on their experiences of medically-related microaggressions during their lifetime, and during their pregnancy using an anonymous survey. In addition, women will be asked questions about their general and pregnancy-related health (e.g., pregnancy-related complications, labor and delivery, gestational diabetes), the health of their infant (e.g., birth weight, gestational age), demographic information, mental health status (e.g., depression, anxiety, post-partum depression), and health habits (e.g., sleep, tobacco and alcohol use).
Claire Swedberg at psumopstudy@psu.edu or 847-749-8732
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
Hide eligibility criteria
Inclusion Criteria:
21 to 35 years old
given birth to a singleton baby in the last three years
comfortable with English language
Female
Resides within the United States
Exclusion Criteria:
Men
under the age of 21 or over the age of 35
Has not given birth in the last three years
Pregnancy & Infertility, Women's Health
  Email this study information to me
  Contact the study team