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Here are the studies that match your search criteria. If you are interested in participating, please reach out to the contact listed for the study. If no contact is listed, contact us and we'll help you find the right person.

56 Study Matches

Collaborative Research: Measuring and Enhancing Scientific Creative Thinking for STEM Education and Research: Classroom-Aligned Assessment and Network Neuroscience-Based Mechanisms

The project is interested in understanding how the brain supports creative thinking in the context of solving scientific problems. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and behavioral experiments, participants will be presented with open-ended scientific questions and asked to produce responses.
Brendan Baker at brendan.baker@psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Over 18 in age
English is first language
Right-handed
No history of neurological injury or disease
Under 300 lbs in weight
Exclusion Criteria:
Claustrophobic
Taking medication that affects brain or blood flow
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Location
State College, PA

Elucidating the Necessary Active Components of Training (ENACT) Study

This study will examine the effects of different brain games on cognitive and everyday activities in middle-aged and older adults. Participants will play either 20 or 40 hours of ENACT brain games on a study provided laptop. They will also complete daily surveys on a study-provided mobile phone for the duration of the study. These surveys will take approximately 5-6 minutes to complete per day. The study will last either 6 or 9 months depending on the brain game training time. The study will be done remotely from the comfort of home using study-provided mobile devices. Participants are compensated for their time.
Courtney Fine at cjf5860@psu.edu or 814-865-4773
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age 55-85
Strong English writing and comprehension
Willing to participate for 5 to 9 months
Exclusion Criteria:
Involved in brain training, such as Lumocity or BrainHQ
History of dementia or Alzheimer's Disease
Use of video games for more than 2 hours/week over the previous 2 years
Prevention, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Investigating Face Processing Behavior and Neural Circuitry

The ability to recognize faces differs across people. We are studying this variability in behavior and in brain responses in young adults (ages 18-25 years) in the Lab of Developmental Neuroscience at Penn State. If eligible, you will do face recognition tasks on the computer and answer survey questions. You may also be asked to participate in another session in which we take pictures of your brain using MRI. Volunteers are paid $10/hr for time in the lab. Interested participants can start the screening processing by clicking on this confidential screening link here: https://pennstate.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9NPJ20bQAPd0VKZ
Dr. Suzy Scherf at suzyscherf@psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
18-25 years of age
Native English speaker
Free of neurological and psychiatric disorders
Free of concussions with loss of consciousness
Exclusion Criteria:
Family history of autism spectrum disorders (in parents or full siblings)
Neurology, Mental & Behavioral Health, Vision & Eyes
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Location
State College, PA

Interactions between the olfactory, auditory, visual, and trigeminal systems

The purpose of this study is to use fMRI to identify and characterize the olfactory, auditory, visual and trigeminal-related brain networks. This research will then be use to enhance human health by laying the foundation to develop sensitive biomarkers to identify people who are at risk of developing brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, where olfactory deficits are known preclinical symptoms.
Lauren Spreen at lms553@psu.edu or 717-531-5857
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Healthy subjects with normal olfactory, visual, and hearing abilities
Clear sinuses
Exclusion Criteria:
Non-English speaking
Pregnant or lactating
Presence of a pacemaker, aneurysm clips or any metal in the body
A history of welding, grinding, and or claustrophobia
Neurological disease (stroke, tumor, Parkinson's) or Psychiatric disorder (bipolar, schizophrenia, etc)
Neurology
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Location
Hershey, PA

The Role of Parental Emotion Regulation in Parent-Child Conflicts

This study seeks to examine parenting skills in responses to child misbehavior. Parents complete rating scales about their child's symptoms and behaviors and also participate in computer tasks to measure brain wave activity through EEG. There is an optional section where parent and child will be video recorded while completing activities together. Following the testing sessions are 8 weeks of counseling sessions for parents to help better manage their child's attention and behavior symptoms.
james waxmonsky at jwaxmonsky@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-8646
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Parent of a child aged 5-12 with ADHD
Child must have mild to moderate symptoms of ODD
Exclusion Criteria:
Not having a child ages 5-12 with ADHD
Non-English speaking
Child with ADHD has diagnosis of mental retardation or prominent traits of autism
No additional child in the family can be enrolled simultaneously in this study
Children's Health, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Location
Hershey, PA

Reducing Perception Error in Diagnostic Radiology

This research is being done to find out the relationship between an individual’s mental state and how well they perform visual-perceptual tasks. This will allow us to understand the brain processes related to errors in image perception, to understand how mental states impact medical image interpretation. Overall, this research will help us develop training programs to reduce the amount of perceptual errors in diagnosing images
Lauren Spreen at lspreen@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5857
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Radiologists with different levels of experience
Healthy adults, with college or advanced degree
Normal or corrected to normal vision
Exclusion Criteria:
Non-English speaking
Pregnant or lactating
Presence of pacemaker, aneurysm clips, or any metal in the body
A history of welding or grinding
Claustraphobia
Education
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Location
Hershey, PA

Emerging relations between attention and negative affect in the first two years of life

The CAT Lab focuses on the ways in which emotion and attention interact to shape how children navigate through their social world. We do this through questionnaires and observations of behavior in our laboratory. This particular study will examine how children respond to emotional and social events. We ask infants and their parents to visit our lab 5 times, each visit being 4-6 months apart and usually lasting a little over an hour. During each visit to our lab, we ask infants to look at pictures of people and animals on a computer monitor while we record where their eyes are looking on the screen. Children also participate in several different games and play with different toys (just like those found in a common household such as balls, puppets, plastic animals, etc.). Some of these activities involve parents and some do not, but we do ask parents to stay in the room with their child for the full visit. During visits 2-5, we would also like to collect electroencephalogram (EEG) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) data from your child. EEG measures the electrical activity in the brain using small metal sensors placed on the head with gel. RSA measures heart rate and breathing by placing small sensors on the torso. These procedures do not hurt, are low-risk, and provide real-time measurement of your child’s autonomic nervous system signals, much like an arm cuff measures blood pressure. When the sensors are removed, some children may feel like a bandage is being pulled off.
Caitlin Smith at ces5729@psu.edu or 814-865-3181
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
infant is at least 3.5 months of age
infant born within +/- 3 weeks of due date
Infants without any serious medical complications
Infants of a healthy birth weight (>2500g; >5 lbs, 8 oz.)
Exclusion Criteria:
infant not of healthy gestational age
infants <2500g; <5lbs, 8 oz at birth
Infants who experienced any serious medical complications
Children's Health, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Location
Harrisburg, PA
State College, PA

fMRI based mapping of the supraspinal projections of the exercise pressor reflex

This study will examine how the brain controls blood pressure responses during exercise, and will include 2 separate visits. In one visit, you will perform a series of handgrip exercises followed by inflation of a blood pressure cuff while we collect muscle nerve activity and blood pressure. In the other two sessions you will perform a similar task while laying in an MRI machine.
Aimee Cauffman at acauffman@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-1617
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
age between 21 and 40 years
healthy
able to perform handgrip execise
normal blood pressure
Exclusion Criteria:
claustrophobic
have metal implants
taking heart medication
pregnant/nursing
smoker
Heart & Vascular
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Location
Hershey, PA

Temperament, Evolving Emotions, Neuroscience Study (T.E.E.N.S.)

We are conducting a study examining factors associated with anxiety development in adolescence. We do this through questionnaires and observations of behavior in our laboratory. In this study, we will examine adolescent's emotional development through encountering novel social situations, measuring heart rate and brain activity, and using eye tracking during computer tasks.
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
>= age 13
read and speak English
Exclusion Criteria:
neurological disorders
developmental disorders
Autism
Mental & Behavioral Health
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Study Locations

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Location
Altoona, PA
Harrisburg, PA
Hershey, PA
State College, PA

Parent-to-child anxiety transmission in early childhood: Capturing in-the-moment mechanisms through emotion modeling and biological synchrony

Anxiety can emerge as early as pre-school age (4-6) and is often linked to anxiety in the parent. This study will examine patterns of brain and behavioral synchrony in parent-child pairs as they complete puzzles together and other social activities.
Dakota Reis at drr5484@psu.edu or 814-867-2322
All
All
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Parents/Caregivers over 18
Children ages 4 to 6
Exclusion Criteria:
major medical illness
Children less than age 4 or over age 6
Children's Health, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Location
State College, PA

Examining contextual factors associated with food-related reward and eating restraint

Rates of obesity have risen sharply throughout the world over the past several decades. The increase in the availability of highly palatable, high-calorie foods may be one factor that has contributed to this trend. That is, the availability of such foods may lead to their over-consumption and corresponding weight gain. Currently, relatively little is known about how the availability of foods, per se, affects things such as the motivation to eat and the ability to resist doing so. The current study is designed to help address this knowledge gap by examining the effects of food availability in people with high levels of dietary restraint. Dietary restraint, which refers to the intention to restrict food intake deliberately in order to prevent weight gain or to promote weight, is linked to problematic patterns of eating. This project uses laboratory tasks and brain imaging to study the effects of food availability on various outcomes, including food choices, food craving, and responses in brain areas linked to motivation.
Josie Huang at suh438@psu.edu or 814-867-2333
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Participants must be between the ages of 18 and 45.
Participants must be right handed.
Participants must be fluent English speakers.
Participants must have a body mass index (BMI) >= 25.
Participants must have experienced food eating/weight issues.
Exclusion Criteria:
If participants are currently engaging in active dieting behaviors (e.g., a weight loss program) or they are taking medications that could alter appetite or body weight.
If participant have a lifetime history of diagnosed eating disorders, diabetes, hyperglycemia, high levels of triglycerides, or high cholesterol or other related medical conditions.
If participants have any known risk from exposure to high-field strength magnetic fields (e.g., pace makers), any irremovable metallic foreign objects in their body (e.g., braces), or a questionable history of metallic fragments.
If participants report that they are vegetarian/vegan.
If participants are not willing to refrain from using alcohol for 24 hours or from using nicotine products/recreational drugs for 3 weeks, or unwilling to fast from food for 5 hours prior to two of three lab visits.
Food & Nutrition, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Location
State College, PA

Inflammatory, Behavioral and Neural Markers of Anhedonia in Major Depressive Disorder

The purpose of this study is to investigate the underlying biological causes of the loss of pleasure in individuals diagnosed with depression. This study will examine brain, behavioral, and inflammatory markers of depression. Participants will answer questions, give blood and saliva, undergo fMRI and perform computer tasks. The study is also recruiting healthy controls with no history of major mental illnesses. Participants will be compensated $130 in total. To limit time in-person, the first portion of the study will be conducted remotely (1.5hrs), followed by an in-person appointment (3hrs). Mandatory COVID-19 precautions will be taken to ensure safety for the in-person appointment.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Major Depressive Disorder
Failed two lines of anti depressant treatment
Between 18-65 years of age
Exclusion Criteria:
Any metallic implant
Bipolar Disorder or Psychotic Disorder
Heavy alcohol or recreational drug use
Inflammatory disease like Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis
Infectious Diseases & Immune System, Prevention, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Location
Hershey, PA

Study of Angelica gigas dietary supplements (Cogni.Q) and potential effects on human immune cells

This human study will test the impact of dietary supplement vegicaps containing Korean Angelica root extract on 2 types of human immune cells: neutrophils that kill bacteria and other germs and natural killer (NK) cells that kill virus-infected cells and cancers. We had done an earlier study with Korean Angelica supplement and discovered even a single dose of it increased blood neutrophils and NK cells within 24 h. In the new study, Korean Angelica capsules (Cogni.Q) will be compared head-to-head with dummy (placebo) capsules. This is to make sure the immune boosting actions are really from the Korean Angelica supplement. Approximately 40 men will take part in this research study at Hershey Medical Center.
Male
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Male subjects 21 to 65 years of age
Subjects weighing between 110 to 240 pounds; their body mass index (BMI) should be in the range of 19=< BMI >=30
Subjects having normal hepatic, renal function as assessed by history, physical and clinical chemistry analysis (CMP eGFR).
Subjects with normal blood pressure (systolic below 120 mm Hg and diastolic below 80 mm Hg)
Exclusion Criteria:
Subjects positive for HIV, HBV and HCV (self-reported)
Subjects taking any kind of prescription medications regularly or within 10 days of the study will be excluded.
Subjects taking dietary or herbal supplements that contain AGN (e.g. Cogni.Q, Decursinol-50, Ache Action, Fast-Acting Joint Formula, EstroG-100/Profemin) within 10 days of the study.
Non-English-speaking subjects
Infectious Diseases & Immune System, Blood Disorders, Food & Nutrition
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Location
Hershey, PA

Learning about Girls’ Emotions Study

In this study, we hope to better understand whether certain behaviors, reactions and feelings associated with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) are found in girls, and how these things may or may not be related to ADHD and brain activity patterns. BPD is a condition that usually is found in adults, and is linked to emotional and behavior problems in children. In doing so, we are asking girls between the ages of 8-12 years and their parents to participate in our research.
Attention and Behavior Clinic Research Group at abc@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-0003, ext=285968
Female
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Ages 8-12 years
Female
With or without ADHD Diagnosis
Speak fluent English
Exclusion Criteria:
Younger than 8 years old
Older than 12 years old
Male
Neurology, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Location
Hershey, PA

Characterizing the Visual Pathway in Epilepsy

This research is being done to determine whether the way your brain processes vision is involved in the epilepsy disease process. There has been recent evidence suggesting that epilepsy patients, compared to healthy controls, have thinner retinas, specifically a layer called the retinal nerve fiber layer, the inner most layer of the retina. This study will expand on that finding by investigating any differences in all of the retinal layers, as well as visual function, between epilepsy patients and healthy controls.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
All: 18-65 years of age
Patients only: Clinical diagnosis of epilepsy
Exclusion Criteria:
All: Those who cannot complete the eye scan or visual tests
All: Those who have diabetes
All: Those who have glaucoma
Neurology, Vision & Eyes
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Location
Hershey, PA

Attention and Emotional Development in Children

Children with attention problems often feel anxious or worried, and likewise, children who are anxious or worried often have problems with attention. We are looking for children aged 8-12 who may or may not have problems with attention or anxiety to help us understand what happens in the brain that could explain why. You will receive up to $100 gift card for your participation, and informal clinical feedback on your child.
Christina Hlutkowsky at ChildAttention@psu.edu or 814-863-0250
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Children aged 8-12
Exclusion Criteria:
Children outside of the 8-12 age range
History of seizures or photosensitive epilepsy
Children's Health, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Study Locations

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Location
Altoona, PA
State College, PA

Neurophysiological patterns of sentence processing

Spoken language can affect the brain in numerous ways. Monolingual (speaking one language) and bilingual (speaking more than one language) volunteers will visit our lab twice. During the first visit they will complete some language tasks. During the second visit, their brainwaves are measured by an electroencephalogram (EEG). Language tasks include listening to words and sentences, repeating words and sentences, and answering questions. Some study activities may be done remotely under certain circumstances; more information is available from the research team.
So Yeon Chun at sfc5538@psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Over the age of 18
Monolingual speaker of English OR
Bilingual speaker of English and at least one other language
Normal hearing
Right-handed
Exclusion Criteria:
Under the age of 18
Does not speak English
Hearing loss
History of stroke, TBI, or seizure
Language & Linguistics
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Long-Term Nicotine Treatment of Mild Cognitive Impairment

The purpose of this study is to determine whether nicotine can improve symptoms of memory loss in people experiencing mild memory problems (referred to in this study as “mild cognitive impairment” or MCI). Recent studies have suggested that one of the causes of memory disorders may be a reduction in a particular chemical substance in the brain. This chemical substance, acetylcholine, is thought to act on certain brain cells in a specific way that helps us to remember and use memories as well as affect our attention. In people with MCI (and Alzheimer’s disease), the level of acetylcholine may be changed, and this may impair brain functioning. Preliminary studies have suggested that short-term administration of nicotine appears to improve memory in patients with mild memory loss and early Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It has been known for many years that nicotine imitates many of the actions of acetylcholine. By administering nicotine over a longer period of time to participants with MCI, we hope to better understand whether nicotine may act to improve memory loss symptoms over the longer term and whether it may help to delay the progression of memory loss symptoms. The amount of nicotine in each patch used in this study is the same as patches that are FDA approved for use in people who are trying to quit smoking.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT02720445
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Inclusion Criteria:
Patient must have a subjective memory concern as reported by patient, study partner, or clinician
Age 55-90 (inclusive)
Study Partner is available who has frequent contact with the patient (e.g. an average of 10 hours per week or more), and can accompany the patient to most visits to answer questions about the patient
Must speak English fluently
Good general health with no additional diseases/disorders expected to interfere with the study
Exclusion Criteria:
Any use of tobacco or nicotine products within the past year
Any significant neurologic disease such as Alzheimer’s disease dementia, Parkinson’s disease, multi-infarct dementia, brain tumor, seizure disorder, etc.
History of alcohol or substance abuse or dependence within the past 2 years
Neurology, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Location
Hershey, PA

Standard Chemotherapy versus Chemotherapy Chosen by Cancer Stem Cell Chemosensitivity Testing in the Management of Patients with Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM).and recurrent WHO Grade III Glioma. CSCRGBM

The investigational purpose of this study is to screen chemotherapy drugs currently used for the care of recurrent glioblastoma and recurrent grade III glioma (a form of brain cancer) and to determine the most effective treatment based on results from a chemosensitivity assay. Chemosensitivity drug assay refers to testing a patient's own cancer cells in the laboratory to drugs that are to be used to treat the patient's cancer. Following surgery or biopsy, you will be treated either as per chemotherapy agents chosen by the physician or with chemotherapies as suggested by the results of the chemosensitivity testing. The study is looking to determine if patients treated with drugs predicted by the chemosensitivity test have better outcomes than patients treated with drugs chosen by the treating physician.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT03632135
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Inclusion Criteria:
Histopathologically confirmed WHO grade IV recurrent astrocytoma (recurrent GBM)
Recurrent surgically resectable tumor
Estimated survival of at least 3 months;
Exclusion Criteria:
Subjects with newly diagnosed GBM
Pregnant women or nursing mothers cannot participate in the study. Women of childbearing age must have a negative pregnancy test within 72 hours prior to study entry.
Neurology, Cancer
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Location
Hershey, PA

3D-PREDICT REGISTRY: 3D Prediction of Patient-specific Response using Ex vivo Interrogation of Live Cells from Tumors

Patients are being asked to participate in this study because they may have one of the following: Brain Cancer (high-grade gliomas (HGG) that are limited to Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) or Anaplastic Astrocytoma (AA)). This study will collect data for a registry that records how a patient's cancer tissue responds to different types of approved chemotherapy drugs. The results of the responses will be shared with the patient's physician. The purpose of this study is to measure the accuracy of new investigational laboratory tests which could predict which chemotherapies are most active to each individual patient’s tumor. KIYATEC has validated a test, the Ex-Vivo 3-Dimensional Drug Response Assay (EV3D, the Assay) prior to use in this study. In this study, KIYATEC will establish the clinical correlation and utility of the Assay in various cancer subtypes.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT03561207
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age 18 years and older
Diagnosis of or suspected diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) or anaplastic astrocytoma (AA)
Patient must undergo elective surgery or biopsy to remove tumor tissue
Consideration as a candidate for systemic therapy with cytotoxic chemotherapy, targeted small molecule inhibitors or immunotherapy
Exclusion Criteria:
Age of <18 years
Do not have a diagnosis of or suspected diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) or anaplastic astrocytoma (AA)
Patient will not have surgery or a biopsy as part of routine clinical practice
Patient has known active cancer metastatic to the brain except for patients with brain metastases that have been treated and are considered stable
Patient refuses to have the assay performed on their tissue
Neurology, Cancer
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Location
Hershey, PA

Discovery of multimodal biomarkers for parkinsonian syndromes, their progression, and pathological relevance

Parkinson’s disease and a number of similar conditions, such as progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy, often look very similar clinically, particularly early in the disease. Since there is no objective way to diagnose these disorders definitively, the current practice is to follow patients over time to allow the disease to reveal itself. Evidence indicates, however, that even the best movement disorder specialist can provide the wrong diagnosis approximately 25 percent of the time. This lack of diagnostic certainty has limited both clinical practice and research. The goal of this longitudinal study is to determine whether specific MRI and biofluid measures, such as proteins in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, can help better diagnose Parkinson’s, progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy patients. Participants with these conditions, as well as healthy volunteers, are asked to complete a screening, baseline and 12-month visit. During the baseline and 12-month visit, participants are asked to complete some questionnaires as well as a fasting blood draw, motor evaluation, smell test and MRI. Participants also may choose to complete additional study components that ultimately may guide the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of Parkinson's and its related disorders. These optional components include skin punch biopsies, a lumbar puncture and participation in the Translational Brain Research Center's brain donation program.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Able to tolerate a brain MRI
At least 21 years of age
Clinical diagnosis of possible or probable Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA) or progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP)
Exclusion Criteria:
Condition that precludes a routine MRI, such as a pacemaker or severe scoliosis
Inability to participate in the study's required components, such as the fasting blood draw
Major medical problems, such as kidney or liver failure
History of cerebrovascular disease, such as a stroke
History of schizophrenia or neuroleptic use
Neurology
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Location
Hershey, PA

Imaging and Depression with or without MS

A study looking at the neural and genetic correlates of depression. Presently, the current study is looking to recruit individuals for two separate groups: 1. MS but NO history of depression 2. Depression but NO history of MS or neurological disease. The purpose of the study is to look at patterns of brain structure and function in individuals with depression and compare them to those with MS. We will explore how any differences we find contribute to more problems with depression in MS and see how such differences might lead to better treatment options for depression.
Cristina Roman at car342@psu.edu or 814-865-5578
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Between the ages of 30-65
Able and willing to undergo an MRI
Able to travel to State College for the Study
Exclusion Criteria:
Current psychotherapy treatment for depression
Started anti-depressant medication in the last 2 months
Diagnosis of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or significant neurocognitive impairment
Very severe depression that would interfere with the ability to participate or suicidal ideations
Unable to undergo an MRI (metal in your body)
Mental & Behavioral Health
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State College, PA

Examining responses to rewards in the laboratory and during daily life in individuals who smoke cigarettes

The goal of this study is to learn more about how people who smoke cigarettes respond to rewards, such as winning money, under different conditions. The study uses a method called functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, which is a research method for measuring activity in the brain. In this study, we are using fMRI to measure how brain activity changes in people who smoke when they receive rewards. The fMRI measures are collected during two separate visits. Participants are also asked to fill out questionnaires and complete computer tasks while in the lab. In addition, the study involves measuring thoughts and behaviors in people who smoke in real life by asking them to fill out surveys on a smartphone. Participants are asked to carry a smartphone for a total of 10 days and answer several surveys throughout each day. In order to be eligible for the study, individuals must be between 18 and 55 years old and you must smoke on a daily basis.
Julian Peck at jnp5021@psu.edu or 814-867-2333
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
21-55 years of age
Right Handed
Smokes cigarettes
Exclusion Criteria:
under 21 years of age or over 55 years of age
Left Handed
non-smokers
Men's Health, Addiction & Substance Abuse, Women's Health
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Altoona, PA
State College, PA

Development of Adolescent and Young Adult Social Health (DASH)

Adolescence is a unique developmental period that prepares individuals for adulthood. We are studying the behavioral and brain basis of this important time, particularly in terms of how adolescents understand and think about other people. To study this important developmental transition, we are inviting typically developing children (6-8 yrs), adolescents (10-14 yrs), and young adults (18-22 yrs) to help us with this study. Participants answer questionnaires, play games of face recognition, and have pictures of their brains taken in a neuroimaging session. Child and adolescent participants also have physical exams. Volunteers are compensated for time (between $185-630) in the lab and for the neuroimaging session. If you are a parent and want to begin the screening process for you child, please go here https://pennstate.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_51lN8sODiukYOON If you are an adult, and want to begin the screening process please go here: https://pennstate.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5cXMng6ybKe0WwJ
Dr. Suzy Scherf at suzyscherf@psu.edu or 814-954-0112
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All
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Native English speaker
Normal vision and hearing (with correction)
Free of neuroneurologic, psychiatric, endocrinology disorders
Free of concussions with loss of consciousness
Exclusion Criteria:
Family history of autism spectrum disorders (in parents or full siblings)
History of working with metal
Irremovable metallic implants in the body (e.g. braces)
Pregnancy
Weigh more than 250lbs or get claustrophobic in small spaces
Children's Health, Education, Mental & Behavioral Health
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State College, PA

Site for A Phase II/III Randomized Study of Maintenance Nivolumab versus Observation in Patients with Locally Advanced, Intermediate Risk HPV Positive OPCA (PSCI# 20-016) (EA3161)

The purpose of this study is to compare the usual treatment alone (radiation and chemotherapy) to adding maintenance nivolumab to the usual treatment. The addition of nivolumab to the usual treatment could shrink your cancer or prevent it from returning. But, it could also cause side effects, which are described in the risks section below. This study will help the study doctors find out if this different approach is better than the usual approach. To decide if it is better, the study doctors will be looking to see if the nivolumab increases the lifetime of the patient without progression for 10 years. This immunotherapy drug, nivolumab, is already approved by the FDA for use in advanced and incurable head and neck cancer. But, most of the time it is not used until the cancer is very advanced and chemotherapy stops working. In this study we believe the use of nivolumab has a chance of preventing the cancer from coming back for patients with your type of cancer. There will be about 286 people taking part in the first part (phase II) of the study and 458 more people taking part in second part (phase III), if the results of the phase II portion are promising and if there is evidence that nivolumab may prolong your life.
Irina Geier at PSCI-CTO@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5471
Male
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT03811015
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age ≥ 18 years.
ECOG performance status of 0 or 1.
Patients must have oropharynx cancer that is p16-positive by immunohistochemistry
Adequate baseline organ and marrow function
Adequate baseline liver functionality
Exclusion Criteria:
Patients with a history of allergic reactions attributed to platinum based chemotherapy agents
Patients must not have had prior systemic therapy or radiation treatment for p16 positive OPSCC
Patients must not have received previous irradiation for head and neck, tumor, skull base, or brain tumors
Patients must not have known hypersensitivity to nivolumab
Patients with evidence of distant metastases or leptomeningeal disease are excluded
Cancer
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Location
Hershey, PA

iVR for the Geosciences

Fieldwork is a core activity in the geosciences. Immersive technologies, such as virtual reality (VR), allow for embodied experiences while not physically present at a field site or create experiences not possible in physical reality. Immersive VR (short: iVR) refers to systems using head-mounted displays to deliver 360-degree experiences. It can deliver remote and large-scale geological entities to the laboratory, allowing geoscientists to apply real-world skills and methods to explore and interact with 3D geological models. We describe a project in which we developed an iVR workbench and experience for Iceland’s Thrihnukar volcano combining satellite imagery with terrain elevation data to create a basic reconstruction of the real world, using terrain elevation terrestrial LiDAR data to provide a point cloud model of the entire magmatic-volcanic system and intensity values for the identification of rock types, and Structure from Motion (SfM) mapping to construct a photorealistic point cloud of the volcano. To reproduce fieldwork activities, this project digs deeply into the scientific workflow of geosciences research, evaluates the priorities of the major phases of geosciences fieldwork, and develops a prototype immersive workbench for direct manipulation, information retrieval, geometric measurement, and the integration of multimedia resources. This workbench offers analytic functions currently not available in the field and is expected to help making fieldwork experiences accessible, shareable, and available any time. Future developments will also allow for collaborating remotely as well as designing repositories for comparative studies.
Jiayan Zhao at juz64@psu.edu or 814-321-6982
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Graduate Students
Major in disciplines related to Earth Sciences (e.g., Geosciences, Geography, and Environmental Science)
Exclusion Criteria:
Younger than 18 years old
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State College, PA