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Suggestions within category "Neurology"


60 Study Matches

Memory and Aging Study

This research is being done to find out more about changes in the brain as we age and to determine if MRI, genetic (DNA) variations, and neuropsychological tests can be used to evaluate memory loss and cognitive impairment.
Lauren Spreen at lspreen@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease
Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impariment
Normal Controls-Cognitively normal functioning
Exclusion Criteria:
Neurological disease (e.g., stroke, tumor, Parkinson's disease, etc.)
Psychiatric disorder (e.g., bi-polar, schizophrenia, etc.)
History of chemotherapy
Presence of a cold or viral infection
Presence of a pacemaker, aneurysm clips, or any metal in body
Neurology
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Location
Hershey, PA

Crest-2: Carotid Revascularization and Medical Management for Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Trial

To assess if the proportion of patients with a primary event differs between patients treated with intensive medical management alone compared to CEA, or to CAS, in patients with high grade asymptomatic carotid stenosis. To assess whether intensive medical management differs from CEA and from CAS to maintain the level of cognitive function at 4 years of follow up To assess if there are treatment differences in major stroke, minor stroke, disabling stroke and tissue based stroke at 4 years, using an analytic approach identical to that for the primary aim. To assess if the CEA or CAS versus intensive medical management difference is affected by patient age, sex, severity of carotid stenosis, restenosis, risk factor level and during of the asymptomatic period
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT02089217
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age >/=35 years
Do you have documented stenosis of your carotid?
Have you had any neurologic symptoms on the same side as your stenosis
No medical history of stroke or TIA on the same side as the stenotic vessel in the previous 180 days
If female, not pregnant
Exclusion Criteria:
Prior stroke with residual disability
Symptomatic ICH within past 12 months
Chronic afib
Ejection fraction < 30%
Do you use an anticoagulant? What medication?
Heart & Vascular, Neurology
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Location
Hershey, PA

Deprexis Study: An online program to reduce depression in MS – a phase III international multicenter randomized controlled trial

An online program to reduce depression in MS – a phase III international multicenter randomized controlled trial
Deprexis Team Roman at mhc147@psu.edu or 814-865-5578
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT02740361
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Inclusion Criteria:
Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis
Current Depression
No current treatment for depression
Internet access
Between the ages of 18-65
Exclusion Criteria:
No diagnosis of MS
No current psychotherapy for depression
No substantial neurocognitive impairments
Started anti-depressants in the last 2 months
Neurology, Mental & Behavioral Health
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State College, PA

Tongue movement in adults with motor speech disorder

Tongue movement in adults with motor speech disorder
Jimin Lee at jxl91@psu.edu or 814-863-5338
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
be a native speaker of American English
have normal hearing
between 18 and 40 years of age
have no known speech, language, learning or neurological disorders
have very little experience in communicating with people that have motor speech disorders
Exclusion Criteria:
younger than 18 years of age; older than 40 years of age
Not a speaker of American English only
With hearing impairment
have neurologic and/or speech/language disorders
have extensive experience in communicating with people that have motor speech disorders
Neurology, Muscle & Bone, Language & Linguistics
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Hershey, PA
State College, PA

Asymmetric neurodegeneration of central olfactory system in early-stage Parkinson’s disease

This research is being done to study the deterioration of the central olfactory system (sense of smell system) in the brains of patients diagnosed with H&amp;Y stage 1 or 2 Parkinson’s disease compared to that of healthy volunteers.
Lauren Spreen at lspreen@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5857
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Cognitively-normal H&Y stage 1 PD patients. A physician-documented parkinsonian symptom onset between the ages of 40-59. 1st visit prior to age 65. PD stage I diagnosis must be documented for a min of 2 years.
Cognitively-normal H&Y stage 2 PD patients. H&Y stage 2, as defined by an exam in the practically defined “off” state, and have a diagnosis of PD at the age of 59 or younger. 1st visit prior to age 65
Healthy participants between ages 40-64 at their first visit.
Able and willing to provide informed consent
Fluent in written and spoken English
Exclusion Criteria:
Parkinson-plus syndrome
Dementia
Previous antipsychotic or anti-dopamine drug therapy
Traumatic head injury
Other neurological diseases or disorders
Neurology
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Location
Hershey, PA

Physical Therapists Role in Promoting Physical Activity for People with Chronic Physical Disabilities

We plan to conduct a qualitative study exploring perspectives of physical therapists and people with disability regarding physical activity promotion
Jacob Corey at jjc6062@psu.edu or 814-865-1691
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
At least 18 years of age
Fluent in english
Individual with a physical disability (eg. limb amputation, spinal cord injury, spinabifida, cerebralpalsy, arthritis, motor impairment)
Has participated in physical therapy in the last year
Exclusion Criteria:
Under the age of 18
Does not speak fluent english
does not have a physical disability
Has not participated in physical activity in the last year
Arthritis & Rheumatic Diseases, Neurology, Muscle & Bone
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Neural Correlates of Cognitive Dysfunction in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a chronic syndrome in which the heart beats too quickly when standing. POTS primarily affects young women. People with POTS also experience symptoms such as feeling faint, fatigue, nausea, and mental clouding or "brain fog." “Brain fog” is one of the most bothersome symptoms of POTS and it is unknown why people with POTS experience this symptom. Some studies have shown that POTS patients have problems with attention, memory and executive function (ability to plan, organize information, and adapt to changes) while seated and when upright. In this study, we will evaluate how brain function during mental tasks is affected in people with POTS compared to healthy volunteers. All volunteers will complete mental tasks while lying down and standing. If eligible, we will measure brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).The findings from this study will increase our understanding of the mental complaints in people with POTS, to hopefully help with development of new treatments.
Aimee Cauffman at acauffman@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-1617
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT04137757
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Inclusion Criteria:
Men and women of all races
18- 60 years old
Previously Diagnosed with POTS or healthy people without chronic illness
Capable of giving informed consent
Exclusion Criteria:
Age <18 years or >60 years
Pregnant or breastfeeding women
Other potential causes for tachycardia (e.g. prolonged bed rest, dehydration)
Taking stimulant medications within the past 3 months as these may alter cognition
Unable to tolerate an MRI scanner (e.g. claustrophobia, implanted metal)
Heart & Vascular, Neurology
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Location
Hershey, PA

Muscular Dystrophy Association Neuromuscular Observational Research (MOVR) Data Hub Protocol

The Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) wants to collect information about individuals with neuromuscular disease to better understand the disease progression and ultimately improve the medical care, quality of life, and survival of those with neuromuscular disease. To collect this information, MDA has created a data registry called the Neuromuscular Observational Research Data Hub (referred to as the “MOVR Data Hub”). The MOVR Data Hub is a kind of database — a way of collecting and storing information.
All
All
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Diagnosed with a neuromuscular condition
Exclusion Criteria:
Unwilling to provide informed consent
Neurology
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Hershey, PA

Site for Poly-omic predictors of symptom duration and recovery for adolescent concussion

Using micro-RNA in saliva coupled with survey data as a prognostic tool with the ability to guide clinical management of concussions
Brennen Harding at bharding@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5656
All
All
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT04582682
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Inclusion Criteria:
13-18 years old
Diagnosis of concussion
Exclusion Criteria:
more than 48 hours after injury
Neurology, Sports Medicine
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Hershey, PA

A Phase 3b, Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Edaravone Administered for a Period of 48 Weeks in Subjects with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

The main purpose of this research study is to test whether an experimental drug called edaravone, is effective as treatment against ALS, and if it is safe and well tolerated when given to patients with your illness. The study will compare the efficacy and safety of an oral form of edaravone (a liquid solution that you will swallow) when given in 2 different ways.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT04569084
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age 18-75
Diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
Forced vital capacity (FVC) ≥ 70% predicted
Symptom onset within the past 2 years
Exclusion Criteria:
History of spinal surgery after the onset of ALS
Currently undergoing treatment for cancer
Hereditary fructose intolerance
Any previous treatment with edaravone
Neurology
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Hershey, PA

Physical Activity, Imaging, and Ambulatory Testing

The PHIAT study is designed to examine the role of daily and momentary variation in cognition in engagement in health promoting behaviors. The project will recruit younger, middle-aged, and older adults for a research protocol involving MR-based imaging of brain structure and function, repeated ultra-brief cognitive assessment and surveys delivered on smart phones, and objective monitoring of physical activity via accelerometers. Key research questions involve determining whether age-differences and individual-differences in brain function and cognitive variation predict the likelihood of translating health promotion intentions into daily behaviors.
Jessie Alwerdt at jua244@psu.edu or 618-267-1044
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Ambulatory
Fluent in English
Has an email account
Exclusion Criteria:
Motor or visual impairment that would interfere with operating a smartphone
History of neurological injury or disease
History of significant health problems that could be complicated by physical activity (e.g. recent cardiovascular surgery).
Participants who do not have access reliable cellular network OR Wi-Fi connectivity
Neurology
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Assessment of nocturnal hypoventilation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

The overall goals of this study are to identify how measurement of carbon dioxide during sleep can improve recognition of respiratory distress in neuromuscular disease and thus improve timely access to respiratory therapies which prolong survival. Subjects in this study will participate for up to one year, during which their carbon dioxide levels will be measured in clinic and in their homes during sleep.
Andrew Geronimo at ageronimo@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
18 years of age or older.
Plan to be followed up in person in the Hershey ALS Clinic for the next 12 months.
Experiencing early respiratory change.
Able to perform or have assistance performing home CO2 measurements.
Exclusion Criteria:
In hospice or in active transition to hospice
Use of any type of non-invasive ventilation, except in the case of CPAP for obstructive sleep apnea, or have a tracheostomy
Use of diaphragm pacer
Pre-existing pulmonary disease requiring supplemental oxygen for any portion of the day or night
Neurology
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Hershey, PA

Remote pulmonary function testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

The specific objective of this proposal is to validate the practice of remote pulmonary function testing (rPFT) through home measurement of breathing function. The central hypothesis is that guided home assessment of breathing function is a valid method for detecting respiratory distress. This study has the potential to transform the current practice of conducting breathing assessments every three months, resulting in timelier detection and management of respiratory distress. The study has two parts. [CLOSED TO ENROLLMENT] The first part is a self-controlled study which will enroll 40 patients from the ALS clinic. On the day of their clinical visit, study participants will perform both a standard PFT with a respiratory therapist and a simulated rPFT. The primary hypothesis is that there is no difference in the results of PFT and rPFT. The second part is a two-arm randomized intervention in 40 patients with ALS. All subjects will perform weekly home respiratory testing for up to a year, and complete questionnaires at regular intervals during this period. Part 2 also incorporates a nurse health coaching component, with subjects randomized to a group that recieves monthly nurse coaching, and one that does not.
Wint Nandar at wnandar@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Possess a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
Be 18 years of age or older.
Have a caregiver available to assist with home PFTs or, in the opinion of the investigator, can perform home PFTs unassisted.
Symptom onset within the last three years.
Have an internet-capable home computer and cellphone.
Exclusion Criteria:
Inability to perform pulmonary function testing with mouthpiece or with mask, as determined by one of the study investigators.
Neurology
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Hershey, PA

Digital tools for assessment of motor functions and falls in ALS

This is a 48-week single arm study that incorporates digital tools for assessing motor function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). During the study, neck- and wrist-worn “activity sensors” (PAMSys, BioSensics, Newton, MA) will be worn by subjects while performing tasks of daily living. Subjects will also complete a motor, speech, and handwriting assessment during site visits. They will complete a digital home assessments of speech, handwriting, and pattern tracing tasks throughout the study, and report any falls which occur on the study tablet. We will explore whether sensor-based functional changes are sensitive to self-reported changes over the length of the study.
Wint Nandar at wnandar@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT05271435
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Inclusion Criteria:
Diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), or progressive muscular atrophy (PMA)
18 years of age or older
Walking with or without mobility support (such as a cane or walker)
Fluent in written and spoken English
Exclusion Criteria:
Neurological or orthopedic problems independent of inclusionary diagnosis that affects gait
Pregnant or nursing woman
Prisoner or institutionalized individuals
Have any clinically relevant medical history of other disease or diseases that, in the opinion of the research team, exclude the subject from participation (including severe cognitive dysfunction).
Neurology
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Hershey, PA

Eye-hand coordination during upright stance

The study will determine how the brain controls eye and hand movements during quiet upright stance.
Tarkeshwar Singh at tsingh@psu.edu or 814-865-7851
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
1) Participants should be between 18-65 years old
3) Participants will be right-hand dominant individuals
4) They will have normal or corrected-to-normal vision
5) Participants should be able to stand upright for long periods (up to 2 and a half hours) with rest every 5-10 minutes or as requested by the participant
6) Participants should be able to grasp a handle and move objects with both hands
Exclusion Criteria:
Any history of neurological disorders (e.g., Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis)
Any history of musculoskeletal disorders (e.g., carpal tunnel syndrome)
Any history of cardiovascular disease (e.g., Coronary Artery disease, Peripheral Artery disease, Carotid Artery disease, Hypertension, Congenital Heart disease, Congestive Heart failure, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiac Arrythmias, Stroke).
Any history of conditions or diseases that increase risk for syncope (e.g., Anemia, Myocardial Ischemia, Kidney disease).
Any history of conditions or diseases of the vestibular system
Neurology, Vision & Eyes
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State College, PA

The impact of COVID-19 on cognitive and neuropathological processes leading to Parkinson’s Dementia and other Alzheimer’s Disease Related Dementias (ADRD)

Our objective is to understand potential factors, such as COVID-19, that influence the development and/or progression of Parkinson’s disease and related disorders. We will engage previous, ongoing, and future Translational Brain Research Center (TBRC) research participants to obtain information regarding exposure, current clinical and functional status, motor/cognitive daily activities, and COVID-19 history.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age ≥ 21 years at screening.
Previous participation in a Translational Brain Research Center (TBRC) study, including IRB protocols 40726, 11436, 37016, 5467, 37217 and 42368.
Confirmed living through Allegra if current status is unknown by research team.
Able and willing to sign the informed consent form or has a Legally Authorized Representative (LAR) who is able and willing to do so.
Able and willing to complete the minimum required study visit questionnaires that necessitate video PSH HIPAA-Compliant Zoom (i.e., MoCA, UPSIT, MDS-UPDRS) to the best of his ability, with or without the help of a caregiver.
Exclusion Criteria:
Unable to participate in consent procedures and does not have a LAR who is willing and able to do so.
Unable or unwilling to complete the minimum required study visit questionnaires that necessitate video PSH HIPAA-Compliant Zoom (i.e., MoCA, UPSIT, MDS-UPDRS).
Unwillingness to complete COVID-19 History Questionnaire.
Unwillingness to complete questionnaires and assessments remotely to the best of his ability.
For those willing to undergo an optional brain MRI, any condition that precludes its routine performance.
COVID-19, Neurology
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Predicting Concussion Outcomes with Salivary miRNA

The purpose of this study is to identify changes in salivary micro ribosomal nucleic acid (miRNA) expression that are predictive of symptom duration and severity following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in children. The primary endpoints of this study are as follows: 1) Characterization of brain-related miRNA in the saliva of 250 children with mTBI and 200 age- and gender-matched controls between the ages of five and twenty-three years. 2) Identification of a set of salivary miRNAs that is predictive of duration and severity of mTBI symptoms.
Brennen Harding at bharding@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5656
All
All
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT02901821
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Inclusion Criteria:
5 to 23 years of age
Seen in the Penn State Pediatric Concussion Clinic within 2 weeks of most recent concussion
Exclusion Criteria:
Does not speak english
Periodontal disease
Ongoing seizure disorder, or other neurologic disorder
Drug or alcohol dependency
clinical diagnosis of severe TBI
Children's Health, Neurology, Sports Medicine
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Hershey, PA

RESTORE: A clinical study of patients with symptomatic neuRogenic orthostatic hypotEnsion to assess Sustained effecTs Of dRoxidopa thErapy

This is a multi-site, placebo-controlled, double-blind, time to intervention study designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of droxidopa versus placebo over a 12-week double-blind treatment period in patients with symptomatic NOH who have previously received up to 16 weeks of open-label treatment with an individually optimized dose of droxidopa (randomized withdrawal design).
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT02586623
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Inclusion Criteria:
Symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension associated with: (1) primary autonomic failure (Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple System Atrophy, Pure Autonomic Failure), (2) Non-Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy, or (3) Dopamine Beta Hydroxylase deficiency
Able to stand, with or without limited assistance
Exclusion Criteria:
History of heart attack within the past 2 years, congestive heart failure (class 3 or 4), or uncontrolled cardiac arrhythmia
High blood pressure that requires treatment with blood pressure medication
History of cancer within the past 2 years (some exceptions can be discussed)
Diabetic autonomic neuropathy
Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding
Neurology
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Hershey, PA

Monetary Reward Processing and Emotion Regulation in Adolescence: An fMRI pilot Study

This research is being done to identify patterns of brain activation underlying monetary reward processing and emotion regulation in adolescence, as well as correspondence between parent and adolescent neural activation. Children and their parents will complete questionnaires. Children will complete computer tasks during EEG and in an MRI scanner. Parents can also complete the MRI scan if interested.
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Ages 12--16 years
Fluent in English
No history of treatment for psychiatric disorders
Exclusion Criteria:
Intellectual or developmental disabilities
Visual or hearing impairments
Inability to complete MRI scan due a pacemaker, aneurysm clips or any metal in body (e.g., braces, surgical devices)
Currently pregnant or lactating
Neurological disease (e.g., stroke, tumor, Parkinson’s disease, etc.)
Children's Health, Neurology, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Hershey, PA

Interlimb differences in Motor Control and Learning

This study examines how each brain hemisphere contributes to motor control and coordination. Participants play virtual reality/computer games to look at how their arms move during different activities.
Brooke Fosaaen at sainburglab@psu.edu or 814-865-7937
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
over the age of 18
Exclusion Criteria:
neurological disease
upper-extremity orthopedic injuries that interfere with participation
Neurology, Sports Medicine, Muscle & Bone
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Hershey, PA
State College, PA

Asymmetries in Cognitive Aspects of Motor Control and Learning

This study will improve our understanding of movement control and how strokes of different sides affect overall independence. Participants will complete the visit seated at a chair with sensors connected to the less-affected arm. They will then play a short virtual reality game and complete several questionnaires and assessments.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Right handed (pre-stroke)
Neurological confirmation of unilateral stroke
Severe paresis on one side only
Adults over the age of 18
Chronic stage of stroke (>3 months post stroke)
Exclusion Criteria:
Left-handed (pre-stroke)
Neuro radiological confirmation of extensive periventricular white matter changes
History of neurological diseases other than stroke
Significant joint pain that is activity limiting
Neurology
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Hershey, PA

Prion Disease Registry at Penn State Health

This research is being done to help us better understand prion disease. The goal of the study is to establish a registry of patients with rapidly progressive dementia, suspected prion disease, or confirmed prion disease. A disease registry is an extensive collection of data related to patients with a specific diagnosis that plays an important role in the surveillance of a disease. Prion disease has poor prognosis, yet there is currently no approved treatment. The collection of information from prion patients will help us gather information to help advance the study of this pathology and potentially help contribute to treatments and preventative methods in the future.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Aged 18 or older
Diagnosed with prion disease
Suspected prion disease
Rapidly progressive dementia
Exclusion Criteria:
Aged less than 18
Without diagnosis of or suspected prion disease, or without rapidly progressive dementia
Neurology
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Multimodal MR imaging of the midbrain for early Parkinson’s progression

This longitudinal MRI study aims to assess two novel MRI markers for early Parkinson's disease progression. Early stage Parkinson's patients, as well as healthy volunteers of similar ages, are eligible to be enrolled into the study.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
At least 35 years of age
Able to tolerate a brain MRI
Received initial diagnosis of Parkinson's disease within approximately the prior 3.5 years
Exclusion Criteria:
Older than 85 years of age
Condition that precludes a routine MRI, such as a pacemaker or severe scoliosis
Major medical problems, such as kidney or liver failure
History of cerebrovascular disease, such as a stroke
Intention to pursue deep brain stimulation (DBS) within the upcoming year
Neurology
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Hershey, PA

Linking olfactory deficits to memory impairment and AD neurodegeneration

The purpose of this voluntary research study is to find out more about changes in the brain as we age. This study is trying to determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), genetic variations, amyloid positron emissions tomography (PET), neuropsychological testing, and smell tests can be used to evaluate memory loss and cognitive impairment.
Rommy Elyan at relyan@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Individuals between ages 65-85
Exclusion Criteria:
Non-English speaking
Smell impairment
Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding
Currently smoke
Have claustrophobia
Neurology
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Hershey, PA

A multisensory evoked potential brain-computer interface for communication in ALS

A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a device that has the potential to restore communication by direct translation of brain signals. The BCI used in this study, the P300 Speller, relies on the generation of a P300 evoked potential when a user is presented a rare and unpredictable target stimulus amidst a larger pool of non-target stimuli. This evoked potential is used to perform selections on the computer. Those with advanced ALS demonstrate decreased capacity for BCI control using the P300 speller. With this study, we aim to use a combination of eye tracking and sensory testing to quantify sensory and cognitive processes necessary for the generation of a P300 response. We will test the performance of a multisensory P300 spelling task, where brain potentials are evoked using a combination of visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli. The goal is to demonstrate the perceptual benefits of multisensory integration and generate evidence for its use in this patient group.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
18 years of age or older
Fluent in written and spoken English.
Able to visit the study site in-person for the study visit
(Patient Group Only)
•Diagnosis of motor neuron disease, including ALS.
(Control Group Only) Neurologically healthy individuals matching the age, gender, and education level of the patient cohort.
Exclusion Criteria:
Those unable to undergo electroencephalography (EEG) due to either allergies to lotions, cuts on the scalp or active infections.
History of seizure disorder
Co-existing neurological or psychiatric illness that, in the opinion of the research team, exclude the subject from participation.
Neurology
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Location
Hershey, PA

Interventional, Randomized, Double-blind, Parallel-group, Placebo-controlled, Multi-centre Study to Assess the Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of Lu AF82422 in Patients with Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)

18331A (AMULET - Delay Multiple System Atrophy) is a Phase 2, placebo-controlled trial designed to assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of Lu AF82422 in subjects with MSA MSA-C or MSA-P). The study is planned to consist of a screening period of 4 weeks, a randomization period of 2 weeks and a double-blind treatment period of 48 to 72 weeks . Approximately 60 subjects are planned to be randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive either Drug A, or placebo.
Michael Klemick at TBRC@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5233
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT05104476
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Inclusion Criteria:
Multiple System Atrophy
Age >=40 and <=75 at screening
Exclusion Criteria:
Pregnant or breastfeeding
Unable to have MRI
Neurology
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Location
Hershey, PA

Brain Mechanisms of Overeating in Children

Reducing intake from large portions is of critical importance to preventing obesity. People consistently eat more when they are served larger portions, a phenomenon known as the portion size effect. The mechanisms of the portion size effect are not well understood, and investigating the underlying neurobiology that drives this phenomenon may inform the development of more effective obesity prevention programs. The proposed research will follow healthy weight children who vary by family risk for obesity to identify the neurobiological and appetitive traits that are implicated in overeating and weight gain during the critical pre-adolescent period. We expect results to confirm the hypothesis that reduced function of brain inhibitory pathways and increased activity in brain reward pathways in response to portion size cues contributes to excess intake with large portions and greater weight gain over time, particularly in children who have higher risk for obesity. The proposed studies will characterize the relationship between brain response to portion size and eating behavior and will allow us to determine whether brain and behavioral responses predict body fat gain during pre-adolescence. These studies will contribute essential information to our understanding of the pathways implicated in overeating and obesity and will facilitate the characterization of “at risk” phenotypes that can be targeted by prevention programs.
Kyle Hallisky at kmh6587@psu.edu or 814-865-5169
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT03341247
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Inclusion Criteria:
The child must be age 7-8 when the first study visit is completed
The child must not have any food allergies to foods used in the study, learning disabilities, psychological diagnoses, red/green color blindness, or claustrophobia.
The child must not be taking any medications known to influence cognitive function, taste, appetite or blood flow
The child's BMI must be below the 90th percentile at the first visit
The biological mother and father must have a BMI between 18.5-25 kg/m2 (low-risk group) or greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 for mothers and greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2 for fathers (high-risk group) and 1 parent must attend all visits.
Exclusion Criteria:
Children will be excluded if they are not within the age requirements (< than 7 years old or > than 8 years-old at the first visit).
Children will be excluded if they have any food allergies, learning disabilities, psychological diagnoses, red/green color blindness, or claustrophobia
Children will be excluded if they are taking cold or allergy medication, or other medications known to influence cognitive function, taste, appetite, or blood flow
Children will be excluded if their BMI is above the 90th percentile at the first visit
Families will be excluded if the biological mother or father do not fit the BMI requirements
Food & Nutrition, Prevention, Neurology
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Location
State College, PA

Long-Term Nicotine Treatment of Mild Cognitive Impairment

The purpose of this study is to determine whether nicotine can improve symptoms of memory loss in people experiencing mild memory problems (referred to in this study as “mild cognitive impairment” or MCI). Recent studies have suggested that one of the causes of memory disorders may be a reduction in a particular chemical substance in the brain. This chemical substance, acetylcholine, is thought to act on certain brain cells in a specific way that helps us to remember and use memories as well as affect our attention. In people with MCI (and Alzheimer’s disease), the level of acetylcholine may be changed, and this may impair brain functioning. Preliminary studies have suggested that short-term administration of nicotine appears to improve memory in patients with mild memory loss and early Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It has been known for many years that nicotine imitates many of the actions of acetylcholine. By administering nicotine over a longer period of time to participants with MCI, we hope to better understand whether nicotine may act to improve memory loss symptoms over the longer term and whether it may help to delay the progression of memory loss symptoms. The amount of nicotine in each patch used in this study is the same as patches that are FDA approved for use in people who are trying to quit smoking.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT02720445
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Inclusion Criteria:
Patient must have a subjective memory concern as reported by patient, study partner, or clinician
Age 55-90 (inclusive)
Study Partner is available who has frequent contact with the patient (e.g. an average of 10 hours per week or more), and can accompany the patient to most visits to answer questions about the patient
Must speak English or Spanish fluently
Good general health with no additional diseases/disorders expected to interfere with the study
Exclusion Criteria:
Any use of tobacco or nicotine products within the past year
Any significant neurologic disease such as Alzheimer’s disease dementia, Parkinson’s disease, multi-infarct dementia, brain tumor, seizure disorder, etc.
History of alcohol or substance abuse or dependence within the past 2 years
Neurology, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Location
Hershey, PA

A Pilot Study to evaluate the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and resistance profile to trametinib and dabrafenib in BRAF-V600E mutated recurrent gliomas

This research is being done to understand how much of two drugs (dabrafenib and trametinib) is able to enter brain tumors and how well the drugs are able to turn off this pathway in brain tumors. The study will also look at how tumors lose sensitivity to this treatment. People with primary brain tumors who are already taking dabrafenib and trametinib and who need a brain surgery are eligible for this study. Biospecimens (tissue, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)) taken during the surgery will help us understand how much of these two study drugs actually get into the brain, their effect, and how the tumors become resistant to treatment.
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
At least 18 years old
Subjects must have a history of primary brain tumor (including but not limited to glioblastoma (GBM), anaplastic astrocytoma (AA), anaplastic ganglioglioma (AG), and anaplastic pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA)).
Subjects must have a BRAF-V600 mutation identified in previous tissue analysis (may be IHC or PCR based). Allowable mutations include V600E, V600K, V600R, and V600D.
Subjects must be taking dabrafenib at a dose of at least 50mg twice daily (adults only) and / or trametinib at a dose of at least 1mg daily (adults only) for at least 7 days prior to surgery as prescribed by their treating physician.
Subjects must be undergoing surgery for clinical purposes
Exclusion Criteria:
Younger than 18 year old
Subjects who are receiving any other investigational agents or chemotherapeutic agents.
Neurology, Cancer
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Location
Hershey, PA

Interactions between the olfactory, auditory, visual, and trigeminal systems

The purpose of this study is to use fMRI to identify and characterize the olfactory, auditory, visual and trigeminal-related brain networks. This research will then be use to enhance human health by laying the foundation to develop sensitive biomarkers to identify people who are at risk of developing brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, where olfactory deficits are known preclinical symptoms.
Lauren Spreen at lms553@psu.edu or 717-531-5857
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Healthy subjects with normal olfactory, visual, and hearing abilities
Clear sinuses
Exclusion Criteria:
Non-English speaking
Pregnant or lactating
Presence of a pacemaker, aneurysm clips or any metal in the body
A history of welding, grinding, and or claustrophobia
Neurological disease (stroke, tumor, Parkinson's) or Psychiatric disorder (bipolar, schizophrenia, etc)
Neurology
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Study Locations

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Location
Hershey, PA