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25 Study Matches

Examining contextual factors associated with food-related reward and eating restraint

Rates of obesity have risen sharply throughout the world over the past several decades. The increase in the availability of highly palatable, high-calorie foods may be one factor that has contributed to this trend. That is, the availability of such foods may lead to their over-consumption and corresponding weight gain. Currently, relatively little is known about how the availability of foods, per se, affects things such as the motivation to eat and the ability to resist doing so. The current study is designed to help address this knowledge gap by examining the effects of food availability in people with high levels of dietary restraint. Dietary restraint, which refers to the intention to restrict food intake deliberately in order to prevent weight gain or to promote weight, is linked to problematic patterns of eating. This project uses laboratory tasks and brain imaging to study the effects of food availability on various outcomes, including food choices, food craving, and responses in brain areas linked to motivation.
Josie Huang at suh438@psu.edu or 814-867-2333
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Participants must be between the ages of 18 and 45.
Participants must be right handed.
Participants must be fluent English speakers.
Participants must have a body mass index (BMI) >= 25.
Participants must have experienced food eating/weight issues.
Exclusion Criteria:
If participants are currently engaging in active dieting behaviors (e.g., a weight loss program) or they are taking medications that could alter appetite or body weight.
If participant have a lifetime history of diagnosed eating disorders, diabetes, hyperglycemia, high levels of triglycerides, or high cholesterol or other related medical conditions.
If participants have any known risk from exposure to high-field strength magnetic fields (e.g., pace makers), any irremovable metallic foreign objects in their body (e.g., braces), or a questionable history of metallic fragments.
If participants report that they are vegetarian/vegan.
If participants are not willing to refrain from using alcohol for 24 hours or from using nicotine products/recreational drugs for 3 weeks, or unwilling to fast from food for 5 hours prior to two of three lab visits.
Food & Nutrition, Mental & Behavioral Health
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State College, PA

Observations of Family Mealtime Routines

The purpose of this study is to gather information about what family mealtimes look like for families with children between the ages of 3 and 8. Families will be asked to video record their family mealtime, in addition to answer some questions and to complete some questionnaires, some about body image and dieting.
Hannah Mudrick at hxm99@psu.edu or 717-948-6404
All
All
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
At least one adult who is the caregiver of at least one child between age 3 and 8 (e.g., at least one parent-child dyad)
Adults age 18 and older
Children, ages 3-8
Individuals fluent in English
Exclusion Criteria:
Non-family members, as defined individually by each family
Caregivers who are under the age of 18
Individuals who are not fluent in English
Families without at least one child age 3 to 8
Children's Health, Food & Nutrition
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Study Locations

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Location
Altoona, PA
Carlisle, PA
DuBois, PA
Erie, PA
Greater Philadelphia Area, PA
Greater Pittsburgh Area, PA
Harrisburg, PA
Hazleton, PA
Hershey, PA
Mont Alto, PA
Reading, PA
Schuylkill Haven, PA
Sharon, PA
State College, PA
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Area, PA
Williamsport, PA
York, PA

AWS-PSU: Active Women's Study at Penn State University

AWS-PSU: Active Women's Study at Penn State University This research study is being conducted to evaluate the impact of exercise and reproductive function on bone strength. Eligible young women (age 18-30) are those that are generally healthy and either a) exercising and experiencing regular or irregular menstrual cycles, or b) not exercising and experiencing regular menstrual cycles.
Nicole Aurigemma at nca11@psu.edu or 814-863-4488
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Regular or irregular menstrual cycles
Age 18-30
BMI between 16-29.9
No hormonal contraception for 6 months
Exclusion Criteria:
Smoking
Currently using medication impacting bone
Food & Nutrition, Muscle & Bone, Women's Health
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Location
State College, PA

Investigation of pulse starch impact on the gut microbiome

We are investigating how the starch from pulse crops (chickpeas, lentils and dry peas) affects the gut microbiome, particularly with regards to the production of butyrate, a microbial metabolite with a number of known health benefits. We are recruiting people from two groups, those that consume a lot of these pulses and those who rarely consume them. These participants will then track their food intake for 48 hours before collecting a fecal sample which they will return to the lab. We will then use these fecal samples to conduct laboratory fermentations with pulse starches processed in a number of different ways to see what factors are important for determining the amount of butyrate that is produced. This will serve as pilot data for designing future human clinical trials.
Darrell Cockburn at dwc30@psu.edu or 814-863-2950
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
18-65 years of age
Either consume pulses twice or more per week or consume them once a month or less. Pulses are dry legumes such as chickpeas(Garbanzo beans), lentils or other dry peas and beans
Exclusion Criteria:
Currently or in the past month taking antibiotics
Taking a fiber supplement
Bowel problems such as IBD, IBS, chronic diarrhea or constipation
Pregnancy
Food & Nutrition
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Location
State College, PA

Perception of Eating Specific Food and Liquid Textures

The purpose of this qualitative/quality of life (QOL) research study is to learn more about people's thoughts and opinions regarding eating specific food and drinking specific liquid textures. We are interested in learning how people's food and drink preferences change with age.
Nicole Etter at oppal@psu.edu or 814-863-2021
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
40 years and older
Hearing proficiency enough to complete a semi-structured interview
English proficiency enough to complete a semi-structured interview
Exclusion Criteria:
History of dysphagia (swallowing disorders)
Currently on a modified dysphagia diet
Currently receiving treatment for dysphagia (swallowing problem)
Participant reports diagnosed dementia or related cognitive disorder
Participant reports any progressive neurologic diagnosis (e.g. Parkinson’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Multiple Sclerosis (MS), etc)
Food & Nutrition, Digestive Systems & Liver Disease, Diabetes & Hormones
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Investigating the effect of portion size on food and energy intake within an immersive virtual environment

This is a cross-over design study in which participants will choose foods items from a virtual reality buffet and eat food items in a lab setting to investigate the relationship between virtual reality choices and real-world consumption
Caitlyn Edwards at cke5143@psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Fluent in English
Over the age of 18 at the time of testing
Have had no prior diagnosis of cognitive or physical disability, dyslexia, or epilepsy.
Free of self-reported food allergies.
Exclusion Criteria:
Not fluent in English.
Under the age of 18 at the time of testing.
Have had a prior diagnosis of cognitive or physical disability, dyslexia, or epilepsy.
Have any self-reported food allergies.
Food & Nutrition
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Study Locations

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Location
State College, PA

Brain Mechanisms of Overeating in Children

Reducing intake from large portions is of critical importance to preventing obesity. People consistently eat more when they are served larger portions, a phenomenon known as the portion size effect. The mechanisms of the portion size effect are not well understood, and investigating the underlying neurobiology that drives this phenomenon may inform the development of more effective obesity prevention programs. The proposed research will follow healthy weight children who vary by family risk for obesity to identify the neurobiological and appetitive traits that are implicated in overeating and weight gain during the critical pre-adolescent period. We expect results to confirm the hypothesis that reduced function of brain inhibitory pathways and increased activity in brain reward pathways in response to portion size cues contributes to excess intake with large portions and greater weight gain over time, particularly in children who have higher risk for obesity. The proposed studies will characterize the relationship between brain response to portion size and eating behavior and will allow us to determine whether brain and behavioral responses predict body fat gain during pre-adolescence. These studies will contribute essential information to our understanding of the pathways implicated in overeating and obesity and will facilitate the characterization of “at risk” phenotypes that can be targeted by prevention programs.
Kara Hickok at kih5334@psu.edu or 814-865-5169
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT03341247
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Inclusion Criteria:
The child must be age 7-8 when the first study visit is completed
The child must not have any food allergies to foods used in the study, learning disabilities, psychological diagnoses, red/green color blindness, or claustrophobia.
The child must not be taking any medications known to influence cognitive function, taste, appetite or blood flow
The child's BMI must be below the 90th percentile at the first visit
The biological mother and father must have a BMI between 18.5-25 kg/m2 (low-risk group) or greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 for mothers and greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2 for fathers (high-risk group) and 1 parent must attend all visits.
Exclusion Criteria:
Children will be excluded if they are not within the age requirements (< than 7 years old or > than 8 years-old at the first visit).
Children will be excluded if they have any food allergies, learning disabilities, psychological diagnoses, red/green color blindness, or claustrophobia
Children will be excluded if they are taking cold or allergy medication, or other medications known to influence cognitive function, taste, appetite, or blood flow
Children will be excluded if their BMI is above the 90th percentile at the first visit
Families will be excluded if the biological mother or father do not fit the BMI requirements
Food & Nutrition, Prevention, Neurology
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Location
State College, PA

The Child Health Study

We want to understand how a child's environment affects biology in ways that impact child health
Megann Koegler at childhealthstudy@psu.edu or 888-924-4535
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Children 8-13 years of age
Speak and understand English
Participation of a legal guardian
Exclusion Criteria:
Intellectual or learning disability
Children's Health, Food & Nutrition, Education
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Location
State College, PA

Postmenopausal women and their endothelium: Is dietary nitrate supplementation protective?

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The loss of estrogen from menopause puts women at a greater risk of developing heart disease. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of drinking beetroot juice on measures of blood vessel health and blood pressure. Participants will drink beetroot juice and placebo juice each for one week followed by blood pressure measurements and ultrasound imaging of an artery in the upper arm.
Jocelyn Delgado at jmd956@psu.edu or 408-679-8390
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT03644472
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Inclusion Criteria:
Women following menopause
Exclusion Criteria:
Individuals taking hormone therapy
Individuals with resting blood pressure > or = 130/80 mmHg
Users of any tobacco and/or nicotine products (smokers, chewing tobacco, nicotine-containing patches/gum, smokeless cigarettes)
Individuals with any overt cardiovascular, metabolic, hematologic, pulmonary, renal, musculoskeletal, and/or neurological disease(s)
Food & Nutrition, Heart & Vascular, Women's Health
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Location
State College, PA

Site For HAT Trial

Site For HAT Trial
Erin Hammett at ehammett@psu.edu or 717-531-1510
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
>25 years of age
not currently eating >2 avocados per month
increased waist circumference (35+ inches for women, 40+ inches for men)
Exclusion Criteria:
does not eat or is allergic to avocados
not willing to undergo MRI scans
unstable medical conditions
lost/gained 10 or more pounds in past year
Food & Nutrition
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Study Locations

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Location
Hershey, PA

Associations of dietary preferences with management of HS symptoms

We will be examining the diets of people with hidradenitis suppurativa to see if they consume different amounts of foods like dairy, tomatoes, or gluten.
Melissa Butt at mbutt1@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
People who have a history of hidradenitis suppurativa
Seen at Penn State Health within the past year
18 years of age or older
Can read/write in English
Have access to the internet
Exclusion Criteria:
Those who do not meet inclusion criteria
Skin Conditions, Food & Nutrition
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Identity Fusion and "Vladimir's Choice": An Exploration of Costly Decision Making

This study will experimentally determine if individuals who identify more strongly with their political party are more likely to make decisions that cause discomfort and possible pain when faced with opposition and competition from individuals with opposing views. This goal will be accomplished in the laboratory via a game between individuals with opposing views that can be won by taking a shot of hot sauce.
Connor Somgynari at cjs72@psu.edu or 224-637-5504
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Over age 18
No food allergies
English Speaker
Exclusion Criteria:
Under age 18
Food allergies
Non-English Speakers
Food & Nutrition, Education, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Study Locations

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Location
State College, PA

Investigating the impact of food form on children’s ability to compensate for energy

This study is looking at how different apple products (apple juice, apple sauce, and apple slices) might affect children's hunger and fullness. During 5 visits to our laboratory at Penn State, children will participate in a variety of games and tasks, and will eat meals and snacks with a research assistant. Children must be between the ages of 4.5-6 years old to participate in this study.
Nicole Reigh at nar5235@psu.edu
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Between age of 4.5-6.0 years-old
No food allergies
Exclusion Criteria:
Taking medication that can affect taste or appetite
Children's Health, Food & Nutrition
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Study Locations

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Location
State College, PA

COVID-19: Implications for Family Meals

The purpose of this study is to gather information about family meals, what they look like, and how they have changed over time since the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants will complete a confidential online survey last approximately 10-15 minutes.
Hannah Mudrick at hxm99@psu.edu or 717-948-6404
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Adults age 18 and older
Adults who live in a household with a child under the age of 18
Adult who are fluent in English
Individuals who can read and respond to written closed and open-ended survey questions electronically
Individuals who live in the United States
Exclusion Criteria:
Individuals under the age of 18
Individuals who do not reside in a household with a child under the age of 18
Individuals who are not fluent in English
Individuals with poor reading comprehension or are otherwise limited in their ability to read and respond to survey questions.
Individuals who do not currently live in the United States
Food & Nutrition
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Portion Size Training in the Immersive Virtual Reality Environment

This study aims to understand how we interact with different portion sizes of food in our environment. Participants will complete a series of tasks in an Oculus virtual reality headset and complete a number of pre-and post-questionnaires.
Caitlyn Edwards at cke5143@psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Fluent in English
Between 18-65 years of age
Must currently own or have access to a virtual reality system and a computer with internet access..
Exclusion Criteria:
Are not fluent in English.
Are outside of the ages of 18-65 years.
Do not own or have access to a virtual reality system and a computer with internet access..
Food & Nutrition, Education
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Longitudinal Associations Between Food Insecurity, Diet, Mental Health, Sleep and Academic Outcomes in College Students

This is a questionnaire study that seeks to discover the prevalence of food insecurity at PSU's University Park campus over the course of a semester and the relationship between long-term food insecurity and academic outcomes, as mediated by mental health and sleep outcomes.
Kiara Smith at kxs782@psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Must be a Penn State student at University park
Must be in their 2nd semester during Spring 2021
Must have internet access
Must be at least 18 years old
Must not have children or other dependents
Exclusion Criteria:
Has diagnosed learning or mental disabilities
Has diagnosed mental disorders
Is unable to read, write or understand English fluently
Food & Nutrition, Sleep Management, Mental & Behavioral Health
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The role of probiotics in attenuating inflammation and improving gut health in obese adults

We are conducting a clinical study that is investigating the effects of yogurt on markers of inflammation and gut health in older adults (55-75 years old) with an elevated BMI. The participants will be given yogurt for 4 weeks and yogurt with added probiotics for 4 weeks. The order of the yogurt treatments will be random, meaning some participants will get plain yogurt first, and others will get yogurt with probiotics first. The participants will be asked to consume one 8-ounce serving of the given yogurt each day during the four weeks. At the beginning and end of each four-week period, the participants will have clinical evaluations so we can determine the impact of the yogurt on markers of inflammation and gut health. The compensation for this study is $300.
Hannah VanEvery at hqv5028@psu.edu or 814-863-3919
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT03418857
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Inclusion Criteria:
Overweight/obese
age 55-75
Non-smoking
Not currently taking cholesterol- or glucose- lowering medication
Not currently taking anti-hypertensive medication
Exclusion Criteria:
Smoking and/or use of other tobacco products
Fasting glucose > 126 mg/dL
Diastolic blood pressure > 100 mm Hg
Systolic blood pressure: ≥160 mm Hg
Clinical diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) e.g. Crohn’s Disease or ulcerative colitis
Food & Nutrition
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Location
State College, PA

Site For Habitual Diet and Avocado Trial (HAT)

Site For Habitual Diet and Avocado Trial (HAT)
Kristin Davis at kmd74@psu.edu or 814-863-0856
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
25 years of age or older
Increased waist circumference defined as ≥35 inches for women, ≥40 inches for men
Not currently eating more than 2 avocados per month
Exclusion Criteria:
Does not eat avocados
Not willing or unable to undergo MRI scans
Pregnant, lactating, intention of pregnancy
Food & Nutrition, Heart & Vascular
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Location
State College, PA

Habit Learning in Adolescents and Young Adults

This research seeks to exam behavioral and neural differences in the formation and maintenance of habit behavior in adolescents and adults.
Daniel Petrie at djp67@psu.edu or 814-863-5124
All
All
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Healthy adolescents between the ages of 13 to 17
Health adults between the ages of 25 to 40
Not currently taking medications known to influence body weight, task, food intake, behavior, or blood flow
Exclusion Criteria:
Outside of age ranges specified
Left handed
Diagnosed neurological or psychological condition including anxiety or depression
Currently or planning to follow a diet for weight loss
Non-removable body piercings, pacemaker, or other metal implants that would preclude safe completion of an MRI
Addiction & Substance Abuse, Food & Nutrition, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Location
State College, PA

The effect of pistachios on blood sugar control, heart and gut health

The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of nighttime pistachio consumption (i.e., after dinner and before sleep) on fasting blood sugar levels, longer-term blood sugar control, and risk factors for heart disease. This study will also investigate how pistachios affects gut health.
Terry Riley at tmr359@psu.edu or 866-778-3438
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT04056208
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age 30-65 years
BMI 25-45 kg/m2
Not taking anti-hypertensive, lipid lowering, glucose lowering drugs, steroids, or antibiotics
Not currently using tobacco products or smoking
Exclusion Criteria:
Established heart disease, stroke, diabetes, liver, kidney, autoimmune diseases or inflammatory conditions such as gastrointestinal disorders or rheumatoid arthritis
Tree nut allergy
Pregnant, lactating, planning to become pregnant or have given birth in the past year
Weight loss of ≥10% of body weight within the past 6 months
Night shift-workers and and those who cannot consume a snack in the evening
Food & Nutrition, Heart & Vascular
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Location
State College, PA

Lunch Meal Study for Men and Women

The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of how individuals respond to different versions of a lunch meal.
Cara Meehan at cmt5070@psu.edu or 814-863-8482
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT04404998
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Inclusion Criteria:
Adult 20
•55 years old
BMI greater than 18.0
Vaccinated against COVID-19
Exclusion Criteria:
< 20 years old
BMI < 18.0 kg/m^2
> 55 years old
Not vaccinated against COVID-19
Food & Nutrition
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State College, PA

Does sleep and eating are associated with the severity of panic attacks?

We plan to conduct a pre and post-test comparison study to investigate the change of sleeping and eating patterns, sleep quality, key nutritional supplement between individuals with panic disorder with and without stressful life events.
Yi-An Burleson at ylb5007@psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Has had a panic attack
Has had a physician rule out medical conditions which may mimic symptoms of panic attacks
Exclusion Criteria:
Does not have any other comorbid mental illness
has medical or psychological causes of diseases which mimic symptoms of panic attack (e.g. cardiovascular, respiratory, neuro-muscular diseases, or posttraumatic stress disorder)
Food & Nutrition, Sleep Management, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Measuring the impact of three types of resistant starch on fecal butyrate levels and the gut microbiome in healthy and obese individuals

This is dietary intervention trial that will examine the impact of consuming three different types of resistant starch on the gut microbiome and butyrate levels in normal weight and obese individuals. Participants will consume starch samples daily for 24 weeks, collecting weekly fecal samples that will be returned to the lab. Researchers will analyze the bacterial fermentation products in these samples, particularly butyrate and analyze the microbiome composition. This will allow identification of differences in resistant starch (a dietary fiber) processing between normal weight and obese individuals and will also determine if the three resistant starches tested have differing impacts on the microbiome and butyrate levels.
Darrell Cockburn at dwc30@psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
BMI greater than 30
Exclusion Criteria:
Diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Diagnosis of Diabetes
Pregnant
Taking antibiotics
Food & Nutrition
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Location
State College, PA

Study of Angelica gigas dietary supplements (Cogni.Q) and potential effects on human immune cells

This human study will test the impact of dietary supplement vegicaps containing Korean Angelica root extract on 2 types of human immune cells: neutrophils that kill bacteria and other germs and natural killer (NK) cells that kill virus-infected cells and cancers. We had done an earlier study with Korean Angelica supplement and discovered even a single dose of it increased blood neutrophils and NK cells within 24 h. In the new study, Korean Angelica capsules (Cogni.Q) will be compared head-to-head with dummy (placebo) capsules. This is to make sure the immune boosting actions are really from the Korean Angelica supplement. Approximately 40 men will take part in this research study at Hershey Medical Center.
Male
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
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Inclusion Criteria:
Male subjects 21 to 65 years of age
Subjects weighing between 110 to 240 pounds; their body mass index (BMI) should be in the range of 19=< BMI >=30
Subjects having normal hepatic, renal function as assessed by history, physical and clinical chemistry analysis (CMP eGFR).
Subjects with normal blood pressure (systolic below 120 mm Hg and diastolic below 80 mm Hg)
Exclusion Criteria:
Subjects positive for HIV, HBV and HCV (self-reported)
Subjects taking any kind of prescription medications regularly or within 10 days of the study will be excluded.
Subjects taking dietary or herbal supplements that contain AGN (e.g. Cogni.Q, Decursinol-50, Ache Action, Fast-Acting Joint Formula, EstroG-100/Profemin) within 10 days of the study.
Non-English-speaking subjects
Infectious Diseases & Immune System, Blood Disorders, Food & Nutrition
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Location
Hershey, PA

Understanding Prenatal Hydration Behaviors

To examine women’s self-reported pregnancy hydration behaviors, especially during a global pandemic. This study will also examine other lifestyle behaviors (e.g., weight gain, exercise, eating behaviors, sleep, pain management). It is hypothesized that hydration behaviors will decrease due to lifestyle changes related to the pandemic. Secondary outcomes will also be influenced by hydration behaviors and pandemic lifestyle changes.
Abigail Pauley at amp34@psu.edu
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
N/A
Show full eligibility criteria
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Inclusion Criteria:
Pregnant
Women
18-45
English speaking
Exclusion Criteria:
Non-pregnant
Men
Younger than 18
Non-English speaking
Food & Nutrition, Mental & Behavioral Health, Women's Health
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