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Study matches: 22

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Cheese Consumption and Human Microvascular Function

The human body controls the amount of blood flowing through healthy blood vessels. The body performs this vital function by changing the diameter of the blood vessels. The way the body controls blood flow can be different with age and the presence of some diseases such as hypertension (high blood pressure). One of the first signs of a disease that affects blood vessels is a change in the function of the very small blood vessels (microcirculation) of the skin. Studying blood flow control in the skin’s blood vessels helps researchers to learn about the onset and effects of, and develop treatments for diseases that affect blood vessels. Dietary sodium can impair the function of the microcirculation in the skin. This study’s goal is to determine if and how natural cheese may protect against impairments in the function of the microcirculation caused by sodium in an otherwise healthy older people. We conduct a study in which participants eat cheese (6 servings/day) or no cheese during a 7-day low-sodium or high-sodium base-diet. Our approach uses methods specific to the microcirculation to examine how sodium causes human microcirculation impairment and the potential protective effects of natural cheese. Also, we measure blood biomarkers and the function of larger blood vessels to examine the effects of cheese on overall vascular health.
Susan Slimak at sks31@psu.edu or 814-863-8556
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Men and women (55-75 years)
Apparently healthy
Normal blood pressure
Non-diabetic (HbA1C <5.7%)
Exclusion Criteria:
Taking a drug that alters peripheral vascular control
Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Females taking contraceptives (pills, patches, shots, etc.) or hormone replacement therapy
Use of nicotine use (e.g. smoking, chewing tobacco, etc.)
Known allergy to latex or investigative substances
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NCT03376555
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State College, PA

Assessing Dietary Requirements in Relation to Resting Metabolic Rate in Spinal Cord Injury

This research is being done to examine the relationship between body composition, metabolism, and dietary needs in people with Spinal Cord Injury.
Slavoski at PMR_research@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-0003
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
C4-T4 Spinal Cord Injury greater than 12 months
Motor Complete (AIS A & B) spinal cord injury
<5% change in body weight over the past 12 months
Exclusion Criteria:
<22% body fat
Coronary artery disease
Type 1 Diabetes or insulin requiring Type 2 Diabetes
Hypothyroidism
Renal Disease
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N/A
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Location
Hershey, PA

Cyclic Variation in Micronutrient Concentrations and Plasma Volume in Reproductive-Age Women

In this study, we will examine how the menstrual cycle influences micronutrient concentrations in women of reproductive age. We will also examine how the menstrual cycle affects plasma volume in these women. Finally, we will assess the relationship between plasma volume and micronutrient concentrations among study participants. This study involves three visits to the Clinical Research Center (CRC) located in Noll lab, University Park. To participate, interested women will contact the study coordinator via phone or email and provide their name and phone number. A member from the PI lab will contact the interested participant to screen her for eligibility. If a participant is eligible, she will be scheduled to visit the CRC, where eligibility will be confirmed. To confirm eligibility, we will measure her weight, height, blood pressure and conduct a pregnancy test. If eligible, we will conduct hydration test, and measure body composition, then she will complete a short questionnaire about her pregnancy histories and health. She will then rest on bed for 15 to 20 minutes and the nurse will insert an IV to draw some blood ~15mL. Then the nurse will inject her with a small amount of a green dye followed by a series of blood draws (total ~15mL) within the next 5 minutes. She will relax on the bed or sit on a chair for 15 minutes to be monitored by the nurse, to be sure that she is okay. Then we will provide her with a home-based fertility monitor to be used to track her menstrual cycle. We will instruct her on how to use her urine sample to track daily changes in some targeted reproductive hormones during the cycle. The results are displayed in a simple to read format from the monitor. We will use the readings from this monitor to schedule visit 2 (~ day 12 of her cycle). After visit 2, the participant will conduct a few more urine test at home and the results of those tests will be used to schedule her final last visit (~ day 21 of her cycle). On the 2nd and 3rd visits, we will again measure her weight, height, blood pressure and conduct pregnancy to confirm that the participant is still eligible. If we confirm she is still eligible, we will complete the rest of the measurements as in visit one. Blood samples at each visit will be processed and stored at -80C until the data collection is completed. Plasma samples will be processed same day to determine the subject’s plasma volume.
Sixtus Aguree at sua204@psu.edu or 814-867-5938
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Female
18 to 44 years of age
General good health (does not have a known, ongoing health condition/medical issue that requires regular monitoring by a doctor or regular visits to the hospital)
BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2
Regular menstrual cycle (26-35 days) & currently non-pregnant
Exclusion Criteria:
Known allergy to shellfish or iodine
Currently using hormonal birth control or used within last 3 months
Blood pressure on the day of measurements is low or high (SBP <100 or >140 mmHg and/or DBP <60 or >90 mmHg)
Current hypertension or previous hypertensive disorder in pregnancy (gestational hypertension or preeclampsia)
Currently trying to conceive
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N/A
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State College, PA

AWS-PSU: Active Women's Study at Penn State University and AWS-Lincoln: Active Women’s Study Lincoln University

AWS-PSU: Active Women's Study at Penn State University and Lincoln University This research study is being conducted to evaluate the impact of exercise and reproductive function on bone strength. Eligible young women (age 18-30) are those that are generally healthy and either a) exercising and experiencing regular or irregular menstrual cycles, or b) not exercising and experiencing regular menstrual cycles.
Emily Southmayd at eas5377@psu.edu or 814-863-4488
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Regular or irregular menstrual cycles
Age 18-30
BMI between 18 and 30
No hormonal contraception for 6 months
Exclusion Criteria:
Smoking
Currently using medication impacting bone
Current diagnosis of an eating disorder
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N/A
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State College, PA

The Effect of Chronic Consumption of Popular Spices on Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease (CVD), Inflammation &amp; Immune Function, and Diet Satisfaction

We propose to conduct a 3-period crossover, controlled feeding study designed to evaluate the effects of the most commonly consumed spices in the U.S. on CVD risk factors, inflammation &amp; immune function, and diet satisfaction in participants at risk for CVD. The three test diets that will be fed to the study participants are: a Low Spice Diet (SD-Low; &lt; 0.5 g/day of all spices); a Moderate Spice Diet (SD-Mod; 3 g/day of all spices, which approximates average spice intake in the U.S.); and a Culinary Spice Diet (SD-Culinary; 9 g/day of all spices). All three diets will be based on an Average American Diet (AAD), which will be designed to represent the usual dietary intake in U.S. The test diets will be designed to provide approximately 32% calories from fat (which reflects current total fat intake), 11% of calories from SFA and 3400 mg/day of sodium. The SD-Culinary will provide a culinary quantity of spices, 9 g/day per 2000 calories (which is 3 times the average spice consumption in the U.S.). All test diets will be designed with the same foods but will only vary in the quantity of spices provided. All test diets will be fed for 4 weeks each followed by a minimum 2-week break between test diets (during which time participants will follow their self-selected habitual diets). The spices will be incorporated into familiar foods in a highly palatable manner. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effects of a spice blend on major CVD risk factors (LDL-C, BP, vascular health, inflammation and oxidative stress), as well as diet satisfaction.
Kristina Petersen at kup63@psu.edu or 814 863 8622
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
30-75 years of age
BMI 25-35 kg/m2
Not taking cholesterol, glucose or blood pressure lowering medication
Not currently smoking
Free from cardiovascular disease, stroke, kidney or blood vessel disease
Exclusion Criteria:
BMI <25 kg/m2
Taking anti-hypertensive, lipid or glucose lowering medication
Vegan or vegetarian
Pregnancy or lactation
Weight loss of >10% of body weight in the last 6 months
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NCT03064932
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State College, PA

Characterization of the effects of amino acid/electrolyte based beverages on hydration status in young and older subjects

There are many beverages are commercially available on the market. Some beverages have glucose that may impact how long they maintain hydration status. New commercially available beverages are amino acid-based and may be more beneficial in maintaining hydration. The goal of this study is to compare an amino acid-based beverage on its ability to maintain hydration status relative to other commercially available products in both younger and older individuals.
Megan Clarke at mmc40@psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Men and women
18-30 years or ≥60 years of age
Regularly active
Healthy
Exclusion Criteria:
Cardiovascular, renal, or digestive diseases
Pregnancy or breastfeeding
Smoking and/or use of nicotine-containing products
Medications that alter fluid balance (e.g., diuretics)
Illegal/recreational drug use
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N/A
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State College, PA

Effects of Walnuts on Central Blood Pressure, Arterial Stiffness Indices, Lipoproteins, and other CVD Risk Factors

The purpose of the proposed study is to evaluate the effects of walnut-delivered PUFA and their bioactives as a replacement for saturated fatty acids (SFA) on multiple cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including central blood pressure, arterial stiffness indices, ambulatory blood pressure, adhesion markers, and changes in lipids and lipoproteins. We will feed three diets: 1) a low SFA, high polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) diet with walnuts (and their bioactives) (Walnut Diet; WD), 2) a matched walnut control diet (WCD) that will have the same fatty acid profile as the walnut diet (including alpha linolenic acid (ALA)), but will not contain walnuts (and their bioactives), and 3) a low ALA diet (LAD) that will have a similar macronutrient (and linoleic acid) composition as the walnut and walnut control diet, however oleic acid will be used to replace the walnut ALA in this diet. This diet design will permit the WD to be compared with the WCD and low ALA diet (LAD) and, thereby, allow us to ascertain the specific effects that walnuts and their bioactive components (including and beyond ALA) may have on CVD risk factors and artery health.
Alyssa Tindall at amt5284@psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age: 30-65 years
BMI: 25-40
Can come to campus to pick up meals for the day
Exclusion Criteria:
Blood pressure or glucose lowering medication
Habitual anti-inflammatory medication
Using tobacco products
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NCT02210767
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State College, PA

Brain Mechanisms of Overeating in Children

Reducing intake from large portions is of critical importance to preventing obesity. People consistently eat more when they are served larger portions, a phenomenon known as the portion size effect. The mechanisms of the portion size effect are not well understood, and investigating the underlying neurobiology that drives this phenomenon may inform the development of more effective obesity prevention programs. The proposed research will follow healthy weight children who vary by family risk for obesity to identify the neurobiological and appetitive traits that are implicated in overeating and weight gain during the critical pre-adolescent period. We expect results to confirm the hypothesis that reduced function of brain inhibitory pathways and increased activity in brain reward pathways in response to portion size cues contributes to excess intake with large portions and greater weight gain over time, particularly in children who have higher risk for obesity. The proposed studies will characterize the relationship between brain response to portion size and eating behavior and will allow us to determine whether brain and behavioral responses predict body fat gain during pre-adolescence. These studies will contribute essential information to our understanding of the pathways implicated in overeating and obesity and will facilitate the characterization of “at risk” phenotypes that can be targeted by prevention programs.
Marissa Reynolds at mlr5246@psu.edu or 8148655285
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
No learning disabilities
Right handed
Age 7 or 8
No medications known to influence cognative function, taste, appetite or blood flow
The biological mother and biological father must have a body mass index either between 18.5
•25 kg/m2 (low-risk group) or greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 (high-risk group) and must be available to attend the visits with their child.
Exclusion Criteria:
Children would be excluded if they are not within the age requirements (< than 7 years old or > than 8 years-old at baseline).
Children will be excluded if they are taking cold or allergy medication, or other medications known to influence cognitive function, taste, appetite, or blood flow.
Children will be excluded if they are left handed,
Children will be excluded if they report being claustrophobic
Families will be excluded if the biological mother/father has a body mass index < 18.5 kg/m2 or between 25-29.9 kg/m2.
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NCT03341247
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State College, PA

Randomized Control Trial of Dietary Supplementation with Dried Plums on Bone Density, Geometry and Estimated Bone Strength in Postmenopausal Women

This 12-month study aims to assess the impact of dried plum consumption of 0-12 dried plums per day on bone density, bone geometry, and bone strength in postmensopausal women. We are recruiting women between the ages of 55 and 75 with normal to low bone mass who are not currently taking osteoporosis medication. Participation in the study involved random assignment to one of 3 different treatment groups (0, 6, or 12 dried plums per day) and participants are asked to visit the lab monthly for various testing procedures.
Kristen Koltun at kxk87@psu.edu or 814-863-4488
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
Hide eligibility criteria
Inclusion Criteria:
Age 55-75
Postmenopausal
Not taking osteoporosis medication
Normal to low bone density
Willing to add dried plums to diet
Exclusion Criteria:
Currently using osteoporosis medication
Other medications known to impact bone health
Extremely low or high bone density
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NCT02822378
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State College, PA

The Effect of Bioactives in Dried Plums, Figs, Dates, and Raisins Compared with a High Carbohydrate Snack on Risk Factors for Cardiometabolic Disease

This is a 2-period randomized crossover study with free-living subjects on self-selected diets. The objective of this study is to compare the effects of ¾ cup of a blend of dried plums, figs, dates and raisins (DPFDR) with an isocaloric and macronutrient matched snack food on blood pressure, vascular health and lipids and lipoproteins in 50 participants who are representative of the U.S. population and at risk for CVD (overweight/obese, elevated LDL-cholesterol, prehypertension, and/or prediabetes). We hypothesize that the inclusion of DPFDR in the diet will decrease blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol, and improve artery function (assessed by standard blood pressure measure, 24 hr ambulatory blood pressure, central blood pressure and arterial stiffness) compared to the control group and baseline.
Valerie Sullivan at vks5014@psu.edu or 1-866-PSU-DIET
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age 25-60 years
BMI 25
•36 kg/m^2
At least one of the following risk factors: elevated LDL-cholesterol or triglycerides; elevated blood glucose; low HDL-cholesterol; increased waist circumference; or elevated blood pressure
Exclusion Criteria:
History of cardiovascular disease, stage II hypertension, kidney disease, diabetes, or inflammatory diseases
Use of medications for elevated lipids, blood pressure, or glucose
Allergies to test foods
Smoker
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NCT03020758
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State College, PA

Effects of cranberry juice on cardiovascular risk factors in a placebo-controlled crossover trial

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of cranberry juice on central and peripheral blood pressure, indices of arterial stiffness, lipid and lipoprotein concentrations and size characteristics, and HDL function. We hypothesize that the bioactive compounds in cranberry juice may elicit beneficial effects on blood pressure and arterial health, as well as LDL-C and HDL function.
Danette Teeter at dls5001@psu.edu or 814-863-8622
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age 30-65
BMI ≥ 18 and ≤ 39 kg/m2
Systolic blood pressure 120-159 mmHg and/or Diastolic blood pressure 80-99 mmHg
Non-smokers
Exclusion Criteria:
History of acute or chronic inflammatory conditions or heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, autoimmune disorders, or thyroid disease (unless controlled by medication and blood results within the previous 6 months are provided)
History of diabetes mellitus (and/or a fasting glucose >126 mg/dL at screening)
Stage II hypertension (blood pressure ≥ 160/100 mm Hg)
Use of medications/supplements for elevated lipids, blood pressure, or glucose
Chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressant medication or conditions requiring the use of steroids
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NCT02556749
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State College, PA

Pilot testing of fMRI protocols in children

Pilot testing of fMRI protocols in children
Marissa Reynolds at mlr5246@psu.edu or 8148655285
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Children must be between the ages of 6-10 years-old at the time they participate in the phone screening.
All children will be physically healthy and without diagnosed learning disorders.
Exclusion Criteria:
Children will be excluded if they are younger than age 6 or older than age 10 years.
Children will be excluded if they have a diagnosed learning disorder or are not physically healthy.
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NCT03338634
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State College, PA

The Child Health Study

We want to understand how a child's environment affects biology in ways that impact child health
Cheri McConnell at cln3@psu.edu or 1-844-296-4666
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Children 8-13 years of age
Speak and understand English
Participation of a legal guardian
Exclusion Criteria:
Intellectual or learning disability
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N/A
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State College, PA

The postprandial effects of a high fat meal containing spices on endothelial function: a pilot study

We aim to conduct a 3-period randomized controlled crossover study to investigate the postprandial effects of a high fat meal with spice on endothelial function, lipids/lipoproteins and plasma markers of antioxidants and oxidative stress. Metabolomic profiling will also be conducted. In random order, participants will consume either a high fat meal (1000kcal, 45g fat) or a high fat meal containing 2g of spice or a high fat meal containing 6g of spice. Between each treatment there will be a washout period of a least 3 days. It is hypothesized that consumption of a high fat meal with spice will attenuate postprandial endothelial impairment and triglyceride levels in a dose response manner compared with a high fat meal.
Kristina Petersen at kup63@psu.edu or 8148638622
Male
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Male
Age 40-65
BMI 25-35 kg/m2
Not currently smoking
Exclusion Criteria:
Smoking
Taking anti-hypertensive, lipid or glucose lowering medication
Vegan or vegetarian
Previously diagnosed with CVD, stroke, diabetes, liver, kidney or autoimmune disease
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NCT03064958
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State College, PA

Effects of Freeze Dried Strawberry Powder Supplementation on Vascular Function and Blood Markers of Cardiovascular Risk

This is a clinical study that will examine the effects of supplementation with freeze dried strawberry powder on multiple markers of cardiovascular disease risk.
Danette Teeter at dls5001@psu.edu or 814-863-8622
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
Hide eligibility criteria
Inclusion Criteria:
Age 35-65
BMI ≥ 25 and ≤ 39 kg/m2
LDL-C > 116 mg/dL
Non-smokers
Exclusion Criteria:
History of acute or chronic inflammatory conditions or heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, autoimmune disorders, or thyroid disease (unless controlled by medication and blood results within the previous 6 months are provided)
History of diabetes mellitus (and/or a fasting glucose >126 mg/dL at screening)
Stage II hypertension (blood pressure ≥ 160/100 mm Hg)
Use of medications/supplements for elevated lipids, blood pressure, or glucose
Chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressant medication or conditions requiring the use of steroids
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NCT02557334
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State College, PA

The Effect of a Mixed-Composition Meal on Thermic Effect of Food, Fuel Utilization, Subjective Appetite, and Appetite Hormone Responses in Young Exercising Women across the Body Mass Index Spectrum

The Women’s Health and Exercise Laboratory is seeking research participants for a study investigating the metabolic, hormonal, and psychological effects of a meal in women. In addition to being monetarily compensated, participants will receive an analysis of their diet, hormone levels, metabolism, and body composition. Participants should be: Female, healthy 18-35 year old, non-smoking, with a BMI between 16-35 kg/m2, have not had a menstrual period in the last 3 months, and not taking hormonal contraceptives. OR Female, healthy, 18-35 year old, moderately overweight (BMI 25-35 kg/m2), non-smoking, regular menstrual cycles for the past 6 months and are not taking hormonal contraceptives. This study is under the direction of Drs. Nancy Williams and Mary Jane De Souza (Department of Kinesiology) and requires regular visits (4-5 visits) to Noll Laboratory on the University Park campus over approximately 2 months. For more information please call (814) 863-4488, or email WHEL@psu.edu
Kristen Koltun at kxk87@psu.edu or 814-863-4488
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
Hide eligibility criteria
Inclusion Criteria:
Age 18-35
Exercising at least 1 hr/wk
Overweight (BMI 25-35 kg/m2)
If normal weight: no menstrual cycle for at least 3 months
Exclusion Criteria:
Hormonal contraception use in past 6 months
Smoking
If normal weight: regular menstrual cycle
If overweight: menstrual irregularity
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N/A
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State College, PA

The effect of potatoes on markers of cardiometabolic health

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of daily potato consumption on markers of cardiometabolic health. Participants will be asked to consume a potato based side dish and a grain based side dish each for 4 weeks.
Emily Johnston at exj22@psu.edu or 1-886-778 3438
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age 25-75 years
BMI 20-40kg/m2
Non-smoker
Not taking cholesterol, glucose or blood pressure lowering medication
Free from cardiovascular disease, stroke, kidney or blood vessel disease
Exclusion Criteria:
Hypertension (blood pressure >160/100mmHg)
Diabetes (or fasting glucose >126mg/dL)
Established CVD, stroke, liver, kidney, autoimmune diseases or inflammatory conditions such as gastrointestinal disorders or rheumatoid arthritis
Smokers
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N/A
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State College, PA

Examining Reward Sensitivity, Impulsivity, and Habituation in Healthy Weight and Overweight Adolescents

This is a questionnaire and computer-task study that will examine the relationship between decision-making and weight status and how different components of decision-making influence food choice and consumption in adolescents. This might help to explain the lack of success in current prevention and treatment programs targeting childhood obesity.
Nicole Roberts at njr175@psu.edu
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Between the ages of 12-17
No diagnosed learning or psychiatric disorder
No food allergies
Exclusion Criteria:
Previous or current brain injury
Prader-Wili Syndrome
Diabetes
Lactose intolerance
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N/A
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State College, PA

The Dose-Response Effects of Lean Beef in a Mediterranean-Style Dietary Pattern on CVD Risk Factors

We propose to conduct a multicenter, 4-period controlled feeding, crossover study at Penn State University and USDA-Beltsville to evaluate the effects of different quantities of lean beef on lipids, lipoproteins and vascular health endpoints in the context of a modified Mediterranean dietary pattern that is representative of foods typically consumed in the United States. We will evaluate the consumption of 0.5, 2.5 and 5.5 oz. per day of lean beef. These quantities of lean beef were selected on the basis of: what is recommended in a Mediterranean dietary pattern (0.5 oz.), the average amount consumed per day in the U.S. (2.5 oz.), and the amount of protein foods (i.e. meat, poultry, eggs with the exception of fish) in a typical Mediterranean diet (5.5 oz. equivalents), as well as the amount of lean beef we evaluated in the BOLD Study. All experimental diets will meet current dietary recommendations for saturated fat and sodium, whereas the Average American (control) diet will represent current consumption of all nutrients. We believe that lean beef can be included in different amounts in the heart healthy diets we propose to study, and elicit similar endpoint effects. Thus, our results will demonstrate that consumers can enjoy lean beef in the context of a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern.
Jennifer Fleming at jas58@psu.edu or 814-863-8109
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age 30 -70 years
BMI greater than 20 and less than 41
No cholesterol or BP lowering meds
Exclusion Criteria:
Smoking
History of stroke, heart, kidney or blood vessel disease
Diabetes or glucose lowering medication use
Vegetarian
Nut allergy
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N/A
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State College, PA

Attitudes Toward Exercise, Nutrition, and Health

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of our Run for Fun program in changing attitudes of parents and children toward exercise, nutrition, and health. We plan to accomplish this through a 50 item survey administered at the beginning and end of the program.
Jodi Brady-Olympia at jbradyolympia@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
5-12 years old
Fluent in english
parent willing to give permission
Exclusion Criteria:
Non-ambulatory children
Children without transportation to the Penn State Hershey Medical Center
Cognitive impairment
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N/A
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Location
Hershey, PA

Non-Alcoholic Drinking Detection via Wearable Technology: Lab Study

Thirst is often insufficient for maintaining hydration. Volunteers will wear sensors while interacting with another participant, eating a meal, and sipping drinks in the lab. We will test whether wearable sensors can detect drinking.
Ashley Sanders at abs63@psu.edu or 814-865-7935
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
age 18 years or older
Fluent in English
Exclusion Criteria:
Medical condition that interferes with bimanual coordination or drinking
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N/A
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State College, PA

Measuring the impact of three types of resistant starch on fecal butyrate levels and the gut microbiome in healthy and obese individuals

This is dietary intervention trial that will examine the impact of consuming three different types of resistant starch on the gut microbiome and butyrate levels in normal weight and obese individuals. Participants will consume starch samples daily for 24 weeks, collecting weekly fecal samples that will be returned to the lab. Researchers will analyze the bacterial fermentation products in these samples, particularly butyrate and analyze the microbiome composition. This will allow identification of differences in resistant starch (a dietary fiber) processing between normal weight and obese individuals and will also determine if the three resistant starches tested have differing impacts on the microbiome and butyrate levels.
Darrell Cockburn at dwc30@psu.edu
All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
BMI greater than 30
Exclusion Criteria:
Diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Diagnosis of Diabetes
Pregnant
Taking antibiotics
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N/A
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Location
State College, PA