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Study matches: 3

Here are the studies that match your search criteria. If you are interested in participating, please reach out to the contact listed for the study. If no contact is listed, contact us and we'll help you find the right person.


Role of angiotensin II and inflammation in persistent vessel dysfunction following preeclampsia

The purpose of this study is to determine what contributes to blood vessel damage during and immediately following a preeclamptic pregnancy. To do this, we examine blood vessel function in the small vessels in the skin. Understanding what contributes to these impairments may lead to better treatments and/or prevention strategies for vessel dysfunction in women who have or had preeclampsia. Two groups of subjects will be enrolled in this study: women who have delivered within 1 year and who have had a preeclamptic pregnancy diagnosed by their obstetrician, and women who have delivered within 1 year and did not have preeclampsia.
Susan Slimak at sks31@psu.edu or 814-863-8556
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
had a baby in the last 12 months
had preeclampsia or did not have preeclampsia
Exclusion Criteria:
had gestational diabetes
history of hypertension prior to pregnancy
current tobacco use
currently pregnant
currently taking medication to lower cholesterol
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N/A
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Study Locations

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Location
State College, PA

Gestational transmission of HPV from mother to fetus

HPV infections induce changes in the female genital tract, apoptosis in embryonic cells, and miscarriages or premature rupture of the membranes. Importantly, pregnant women are more susceptible to HPV infections due to the relative immunosuppression experienced during pregnancy. HPV-induced Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP) is believed to result from HPV transmission from mothers to newborns as a result of passage through the birth canal. RRP is a highly morbid pathological condition among children. It is characterized by the recurrent appearance of wart-like lesions in the respiratory tract, particularly at the larynx and vocal cords. These patients must undergo repeated surgery or other invasive treatment to manage the disease. Whether HPV infections play a role in infertility and childhood RRP in the Central Pennsylvania is unknown.
Heidi Reinhard at hreinhard@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5166
Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Pregnant
Exclusion Criteria:
Not pregnant
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N/A
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Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (INSIGHT) Study

Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (INSIGHT) Study
Jessica Beiler at jbeiler@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5656
All
Not specified
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
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Inclusion Criteria:
Healthy mom and baby pairs delivering at HMC
Full term baby (36 weeks)
Following at an HMC practice for infant care
English speaking
Exclusion Criteria:
Low birth weight (<2250g)
Medical issues for mom or baby that prevent routine newborn care
Plan for newborn to be adopted
Plan to move out of Central PA within 1 year
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N/A
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Study Locations

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Location
Hershey, PA