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Search Results Within Category "Neurology"

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60 Study Matches

Multimodal brain MRI-guided understanding of non-motor outcomes in Parkinson's post DBS

This study will explore the relationship between multimodal brain MRI findings and cognitive/mood outcomes in Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients following Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). Patients already planning to undergo DBS for PD who choose to take part in this study will have study visits before and after DBS to collect motor, neurobehavioral and physical therapy measurements.

Patients who are already planning to undergo DBS for PD who choose to take part in this study will have study visits before and after DBS surgery to collect motor, neurobehavioral and physical therapy measurements. While many of these components are part of as standard of care, some assessments will need to be collected specifically for research purposes. There are two in-person visits (one before DBS surgery and one approximately 3-6 months after surgery). As part of the study, an MRI to gather data to answer our research questions will be conducted. This is in addition to the clinical MRI that is part of the regular assessment to determine if an individual is suitable for the DBS surgery.

$130 if components of study are completed

Yes
 

Sol De Jesus
Amanda Snyder - at TBRC@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5233
Neurology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00016574
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age at least 18
Diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease
Undergoing DBS as part of standard of care
Able to provide informed consent

Exclusion Criteria:
Age less than 18
General contraindications to surgery
Pregnant or nursing women
Unable to undergo MRI for any reason
Atypical Parkinsonism
Neurology
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Hershey, PA ,

Interlimb differences in Motor Control and Learning

This study examines how each brain hemisphere contributes to motor control and coordination. Participants play virtual reality/computer games to look at how their arms move during different activities.

Yes
 

Robert Sainburg
Brooke Fosaaen - at sainburglab@psu.edu or 814-865-7937
Kinesiology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
PRAMS00040722
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Inclusion Criteria:
over the age of 18

Exclusion Criteria:
neurological disease
upper-extremity orthopedic injuries that interfere with participation
Neurology, Sports Medicine, Muscle & Bone
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Hershey, PA ,
State College, PA ,

Pilot evaluation of a multisensory evoked potential brain-computer interface

A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a device that has the potential to restore communication by translating voluntarily controlled brain signals of intent. The P300 speller, a popular BCI paradigm, relies on the generation of a P300 evoked potential when a user is presented a rare and unpredictable target stimulus amidst a larger pool of non-target stimuli. This evoked potential is used to control a spelling interface. Those with advanced ALS experiencing the loss of voluntary muscular control may also experience cognitive changes that result in decreased capacity for BCI control using the P300 speller.With this pilot study, we aim to validate the performance of a combination of eye tracking and standard sensory testing to quantify intact sensory and cognitive processes necessary for the generation of a P300 response. Additionally, we will evaluate the association of these correlates with performance on a multisensor P300 spelling task, where brain potentials are evoked using a combination of visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli. The goal is to demonstrate the viability of this system for future use in a patient group.

A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a device that has the potential to restore communication by direct translation of brain signals into computer commands. The BCI used in this study, the P300 Speller, relies on the generation of a P300 evoked potential when a user is presented a rare and unpredictable target stimulus amidst a larger pool of non-target stimuli. During this 2-hour, single session study, we aim to use a combination of eye tracking and sensory testing to quantify sensory and cognitive processes necessary for the generation of a P300 response. We will test the performance of a multisensory P300 spelling task, where brain potentials are evoked using a combination of visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli.

Yes
 

Andrew Geronimo
Andrew Geronimo - at ageronimo@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-0003, ext=282576
Neurosurgery (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00018219
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Inclusion Criteria:
18 years of age or older
Fluent in written and spoken English.

Exclusion Criteria:
Those unable to undergo electroencephalography (EEG) due to either allergies to lotions, cuts on the scalp or active infections.
History of seizure disorder
Co-existing neurological or psychiatric illness that, in the opinion of the research team, exclude the subject from participation.
Neurology
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Hershey, PA ,

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and psychophysical studies of sensory perception and cognition

The purpose of this study is (1) to understand how the brain processes sensory information and (2) how this is affected by factors like blindness or synesthesia. In addition to behavioral testing, the study will use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) which enables us to take pictures of the brain while you are doing a task, using an instrument called an MRI scanner.

Participants will perform simple behavioral tasks either stand-alone or while being scanned; they may also complete questionnaires or rating scales.

Amount varies depending on the study

Yes
 

Krishnankutty Sathian
Simon Lacey - at sathianlab@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
Neurology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00012238
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Inclusion Criteria:
Healthy adults over 18 years old
Normal or corrected-to-normal vision
No other sensory deficits
Adults who experience synesthesia
Must pass MRI safety screen (if applicable)

Exclusion Criteria:
Pregnant women (excluded from fMRI studies)
Minors under the age of 18
Individuals who fail the MRI safety screen (may still do behavioral studies)
Neurology, Language & Linguistics, Vision & Eyes
Not applicable
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Hershey, PA ,
State College, PA ,

Filling a Gap in Counseling Services for People with Aphasia: The Effects of an Online Training for Healthcare Providers

The purpose of the proposed study is to improve counseling services for people with aphasia. We will examine the effects of a brief training for speech-language pathologists (SLP) and rehabilitation counselors on therapeutic quality and behavioral outcomes for persons with aphasia.

No
 

Chaleece Sandberg
Chaleece Sandberg - at cws18@psu.edu or 814-263-2006
Communication Sciences and Disorders (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00016765
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Inclusion Criteria:
diagnosis of aphasia
English speaker
normal or corrected-to-normal hearing
self-reported need for mental health services (e.g., grief and loss, social isolation, depression, anxiety)
medically stable

Exclusion Criteria:
does not meet inclusionary criteria
severe mental health concerns (e.g., suicidal thoughts, self-harm, drug and alcohol abuse)
Neurology
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Brain Mechanisms of Overeating in Children

Reducing intake from large portions is of critical importance to preventing obesity. People consistently eat more when they are served larger portions, a phenomenon known as the portion size effect. The mechanisms of the portion size effect are not well understood, and investigating the underlying neurobiology that drives this phenomenon may inform the development of more effective obesity prevention programs. The proposed research will follow healthy weight children who vary by family risk for obesity to identify the neurobiological and appetitive traits that are implicated in overeating and weight gain during the critical pre-adolescent period. We expect results to confirm the hypothesis that reduced function of brain inhibitory pathways and increased activity in brain reward pathways in response to portion size cues contributes to excess intake with large portions and greater weight gain over time, particularly in children who have higher risk for obesity. The proposed studies will characterize the relationship between brain response to portion size and eating behavior and will allow us to determine whether brain and behavioral responses predict body fat gain during pre-adolescence. These studies will contribute essential information to our understanding of the pathways implicated in overeating and obesity and will facilitate the characterization of “at risk” phenotypes that can be targeted by prevention programs.

There will be seven in person visits with two DEXA measurements, one fMRI scan and five meals.

$350

Yes
 

Kathleen Keller
Kyle Hallisky - at kmh6587@psu.edu or 814-865-5169
Nutritional Sciences (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT03341247
STUDY00005357
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Inclusion Criteria:
The child must be age 7-8 when the first study visit is completed
The child must not have any food allergies to foods used in the study, learning disabilities, psychological diagnoses, red/green color blindness, or claustrophobia.
The child must not be taking any medications known to influence cognitive function, taste, appetite or blood flow
The child's BMI must be below the 90th percentile at the first visit
The biological mother and father must have a BMI between 18.5-25 kg/m2 (low-risk group) or greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 for mothers and greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2 for fathers (high-risk group) and 1 parent must attend all visits.

Exclusion Criteria:
Children will be excluded if they are not within the age requirements (< than 7 years old or > than 8 years-old at the first visit).
Children will be excluded if they have any food allergies, learning disabilities, psychological diagnoses, red/green color blindness, or claustrophobia
Children will be excluded if they are taking cold or allergy medication, or other medications known to influence cognitive function, taste, appetite, or blood flow
Children will be excluded if their BMI is above the 90th percentile at the first visit
Families will be excluded if the biological mother or father do not fit the BMI requirements
Food & Nutrition, Prevention, Neurology
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State College, PA ,

Examining elderly traumatic brain injury and risk for neurodegeneration

The purpose of this proposal is to understand the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease after TBI, including time since diagnosis, ethnicity, and genetic predictors. In Aim 1 the goal is to collect data in a large group of individuals with TBI to understand these interacting factors in predicting cognitive decline. Then in Aim 2, in a sub-group of individuals we use brain imaging methods in order to determine the network response associated with neurodegeneration decades post TBI. Ultimately, the ability to monitor the neural network response to injury-specific factors in combination with risk/resiliency factors (e.g., genetic, health) may bring greater precision to rehabilitation in TBI and aid in identifying patients at risk for neurodegeneration years prior to onset. Three specific aims were designed to clarify the role of neural recruitment in recovery from TBI: 



There will be one in person visit that lasts ~5 hours. It involves an MRI scan, blood pressure measurement, cognitive testing, and interviews about social and emotional wellbeing.

$150

Yes
 

Frank Hillary
Elizabeth Rebuck - at exr5373@psu.edu or 814-865-0389
Psychology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00007561
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Inclusion Criteria:
>18 years of age
sustained a traumatic brain injury

Exclusion Criteria:
<18 years of age
history of neurological disorder such as stroke, epilepsy, or multiple sclerosis
history of bipolar
Pregnant or trying to become pregnant
Neurology
Not applicable
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State College, PA ,

PLS Natural History Study

This study will provide a strong basis and foundation for future clinical trials that use historical controls. The study will collect clinical data and biological specimens to create a dataset and biorepository to be shared with other researchers as a foundation for future clinical trials.

This is a volunteer study for participants diagnosed with Primary Lateral Sclerosis (PLS) or suspected to have PLS by a neurologist. You will be expected to attend scheduled visits in person or by telephone, complete study testing and audio/video recordings. The study includes clinical measurements to assess disease status and motor function, a number of questionnaires, collection of biospecimens including DNA, blood, and urine, and an electromyography (EMG) test. There will be 6 visits over 24 months, of these 6 three will be in-person visits (2-3 hours) and the other three will be telephone calls (lasting about 45 minutes to an hour). Blood and urine samples will be collected during these visits.

$100 per in person visit (three) and $50 for telephone visit (three) completed.

Yes
 

Zachary Simmons
nervemuscle@pennstatehealth.psu.edu 717-531-8257
Neurology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00018274
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Inclusion Criteria:
Adult participants (≥ 25 years of age)
Symptom onset was no more than 15 years prior to baseline
Ability to independently walk with or without an assistive device (e.g., walker) at the baseline evaluation
In cases where a molecular test has been done prior to enrollment in this study, HSP or HSP-related mutations are negative
Expected to have at least some bulbar symptoms (dysarthria, dysphagia, drooling or pseudobulbar affect); however, the absence of these symptoms will not exclude participants when molecular testing is negative for known HSP

Exclusion Criteria:
Unwilling or unable to give informed consent
UMN symptoms and signs only in the legs
Unwilling or unable to visit the study site asrequired
Clinically obvious cognitive impairment that precludes obtaining informed consent, as determined by the site PI
Participating in clinical treatment trials
Neurology, Muscle & Bone, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Hershey, PA ,

Discovery of multimodal biomarkers for parkinsonian syndromes, their progression, and pathological relevance

Parkinson’s disease and a number of similar conditions, such as progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy, often look very similar clinically, particularly early in the disease. Since there is no objective way to diagnose these disorders definitively, the current practice is to follow patients over time to allow the disease to reveal itself. Evidence indicates, however, that even the best movement disorder specialist can provide the wrong diagnosis approximately 25 percent of the time. This lack of diagnostic certainty has limited both clinical practice and research. The goal of this longitudinal study is to determine whether specific MRI and biofluid measures, such as proteins in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, can help better diagnose Parkinson’s, progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy patients.

Participants are asked to complete a screening, baseline and 12-month visit. During the baseline and 12-month visit, participants are asked to complete some questionnaires as well as a fasting blood draw, motor evaluation, smell test and MRI. Participants also may choose to complete additional study components that ultimately may guide the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of Parkinson's and its related disorders. These optional components include skin punch biopsies, a lumbar puncture and participation in the Translational Brain Research Center's brain donation program.

$900.00

Yes
 

Xuemei Huang
Autumn Collier - at TBRC@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-0003, ext=281168
Neurology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00011436
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Inclusion Criteria:
Able to tolerate a brain MRI
At least 21 years of age
Clinical diagnosis of possible or probable Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA) or progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP)

Exclusion Criteria:
Condition that precludes a routine MRI, such as a pacemaker or severe scoliosis
Inability to participate in the study's required components, such as the fasting blood draw
Major medical problems, such as kidney or liver failure
History of schizophrenia or neuroleptic use
Neurology
Not applicable
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Hershey, PA ,

Neural Correlates of Cognitive Dysfunction in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a chronic syndrome in which the heart beats too quickly when standing. POTS primarily affects young women. People with POTS also experience symptoms such as feeling faint, fatigue, nausea, and mental clouding or "brain fog." “Brain fog” is one of the most bothersome symptoms of POTS and it is unknown why people with POTS experience this symptom. Some studies have shown that POTS patients have problems with attention, memory and executive function (ability to plan, organize information, and adapt to changes) while seated and when upright. In this study, we will evaluate how brain function during mental tasks is affected in people with POTS compared to healthy volunteers. All volunteers will complete mental tasks while lying down and standing. If eligible, we will measure brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).The findings from this study will increase our understanding of the mental complaints in people with POTS, to hopefully help with development of new treatments.

There will be three in person visits for this study. At the screening visit, participants will undergo a detailed medical history and physical examination and then will complete a mental test while lying down and standing. If eligible based on the results of the mental test, participants will undergo a pregnancy test if female and of childbearing potential, measurements of blood pressure and heart rate and blood draws while lying down and standing up, and a test to determine if they can tolerate being in a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) device that distributes more blood to the legs to mimic standing. If eligible based on the results of the screening visit, participants will be asked to complete an online questionnaire and two study visits that are separated by at least one week. At these study visits, they will perform a mental test in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The LBNP device will also be used while in the MRI scanner to distribute more blood to the legs to mimic standing.

$25 per hour; additional $25 for completion of online questionnaire

Yes
 

Amy Arnold
Aimee Cauffman - at acauffman@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-1617
Neural and Behavioral Sciences (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT04137757
STUDY00012860
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Inclusion Criteria:
Men and women of all races
18- 60 years old
Previously Diagnosed with POTS or healthy people without chronic illness
Capable of giving informed consent

Exclusion Criteria:
Age <18 years or >60 years
Pregnant or breastfeeding women
Other potential causes for tachycardia (e.g. prolonged bed rest, dehydration)
Taking stimulant medications within the past 3 months as these may alter cognition
Unable to tolerate an MRI scanner (e.g. claustrophobia, implanted metal)
Heart & Vascular, Neurology
Not applicable
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Hershey, PA ,

Interactions between the olfactory, auditory, visual, and trigeminal systems

The purpose of this study is to use fMRI to identify and characterize the olfactory, auditory, visual and trigeminal-related brain networks. This research will then be use to enhance human health by laying the foundation to develop sensitive biomarkers to identify people who are at risk of developing brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, where olfactory deficits are known preclinical symptoms.

Yes
 

Prasanna Karunanayaka
Lauren Spreen at lms553@psu.edu or 717-531-5857
Radiology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
PRAMS042765EP
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Inclusion Criteria:
Healthy subjects with normal olfactory, visual, and hearing abilities
Clear sinuses

Exclusion Criteria:
Non-English speaking
Pregnant or lactating
Presence of a pacemaker, aneurysm clips or any metal in the body
A history of welding, grinding, and or claustrophobia
Neurological disease (stroke, tumor, Parkinson's) or Psychiatric disorder (bipolar, schizophrenia, etc)
Neurology
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Hershey, PA ,

Examining Cortical Lateralization of Motor Learning through Transcranial Stimulation

The aim of this study is to understand how brain stimulation affects learning of a novel task on a virtual reality system. Participation involves playing virtual reality games during non-invasive brain stimulation.

Single visit, subjection to noninvasive brain stimulation during a reaching task.

40

Yes
 

Robert Sainburg
Nick Kitchen - at nkitchen@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-0003, ext=283146
Kinesiology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00012605
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Inclusion Criteria:
right-handed
18-40 years old (healthy young)
18-80 years old (stroke patient)

Exclusion Criteria:
left handed or ambidextrous
neurological disease
movement disorder
major psychiatric diagnosis
orthopedic damage to the arms
Neurology, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Hershey, PA ,
State College, PA ,

Concussion-Prognosis

Using micro-RNA in saliva coupled with survey data as a prognostic tool with the ability to guide clinical management of concussions

During their baseline visit participants will complete a saliva swab, surveys, balance test and brief neurocognitive test.Day 7, participants will complete a saliva swab and 2 surveys.Day 30, participants will complete a saliva swab and 4 surveys.The baseline visit is the only in-person visit, day 7 and day 30 are done remotely.All surveys are completed online and day 7 and day 30 saliva swabs are sent home with the participants and sent back in a prepaid mailer on day 30.

$40

Yes
 

Jayson Loeffert
Brennen Harding - at bharding@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5656
Family and Community Medicine (HERSHEY)
 

All
All
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT04582682
SITE00000820
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Inclusion Criteria:
13-18 years old
Diagnosis of concussion

Exclusion Criteria:
more than 48 hours after injury
Neurology, Sports Medicine
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Hershey, PA ,

Modeling Transition Speeds in Elderly Human Walking

This study will involve elderly humans walking on a treadmill transitioning through prechosen speeds.

There will be one, two hour in person visit. Participants will change into specific lab provided clothing for study and reflective stickers will be placed on participants by the researcher. Participants will then get on the treadmill and will walk at prescribed constant speeds for about 5 minutes total. Then participants will perform 10 speed transition trials each of which lasts about 4 minutes.

$15

Yes
 

Ashley Zeman
Ashley Zeman - at apz5261@psu.edu or 724-759-1651
Division of Undergraduate Studies (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00021984
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Inclusion Criteria:
65+ years old
Can continuously walk for up to 4 minutes
Be able to follow verbal instructions

Exclusion Criteria:
Active or existing neuromuscular, cardiovascular, vascular, or neurological pathologies, injuries, or illnesses affecting gait
High BMI (>30)
Neurology, Muscle & Bone
Not applicable
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State College, PA ,

Validation of Early Prognostic Data for Recovery Outcome after Stroke for Future, Higher Yield Trials (VERIFY)

The purpose of this research study is to understand how well we can predict your recovery by using tests done early after stroke. During the months after a stroke, some people recover all the way, some people don’t recover at all, and many people have a partial recovery. If we can predict how you will do in the coming months, we can choose the right rehabilitation therapies more quickly and more accurately.

Data will be collected during the acute hospitalization (in-person), at Day 30 (by phone), and at Day 90 (in person).

$190

Yes
 

Raymond Reichwein
Terri Smith - at tsmith@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-6190
Neurology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT05338697
SITE00001220
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Inclusion Criteria:
Unilateral Stroke due to ischemic or intracerebral hemorrhage
Motor deficits in the acutely affected UE
Provision of signed and dated informed consent form within 48 to 96 hours of stroke onset
Stated willingness to comply with all study procedures and availability for the duration of the study
Fluent in English or Spanish

Exclusion Criteria:
UE injury or conditions on paretic side that limited use prior to the stroke
Legally blind
Dense sensory loss on paretic side indicated by a score of 2 on NIHSS sensory item
Unable to abduct the shoulder extend the fingers of the non-paretic UE on verbal command
Isolated cerebellar stroke
Neurology
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Hershey, PA ,

Eye-hand coordination during upright stance

The study will determine how the brain controls eye and hand movements during quiet upright stance.

There will be one visit to the lab (approximately 2 hours) in which participants will be required to make reaching movements towards virtual targets while standing upright. Participants will be required to wear comfortable shoes.

$20

Yes
 

Tarkeshwar Singh
Tarkeshwar Singh - at tsingh@psu.edu or 814-865-7851
Kinesiology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00019952
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Inclusion Criteria:
1)Participants should be between 18-65 years old
3)Participants will be right-hand dominant individuals
4)They will have normal or corrected-to-normal vision
5)Participants should be able to stand upright for long periods (up to 2 and a half hours) with rest every 5-10 minutes or as requested by the participant
6)Participants should be able to grasp a handle and move objects with both hands

Exclusion Criteria:
Any history of neurological disorders (e.g., Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis)
Any history of musculoskeletal disorders (e.g., carpal tunnel syndrome)
Any history of cardiovascular disease (e.g., Coronary Artery disease, Peripheral Artery disease, Carotid Artery disease, Hypertension, Congenital Heart disease, Congestive Heart failure, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiac Arrythmias, Stroke).
Any history of conditions or diseases that increase risk for syncope (e.g., Anemia, Myocardial Ischemia, Kidney disease).
Any history of conditions or diseases of the vestibular system
Neurology, Vision & Eyes
Not applicable
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State College, PA ,

A Pilot Study to evaluate the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and resistance profile to trametinib and dabrafenib in BRAF-V600E mutated recurrent gliomas

This research is being done to understand how much of two drugs (dabrafenib and trametinib) is able to enter brain tumors and how well the drugs are able to turn off this pathway in brain tumors. The study will also look at how tumors lose sensitivity to this treatment. People with primary brain tumors who are already taking dabrafenib and trametinib and who need a brain surgery are eligible for this study. Biospecimens (tissue, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)) taken during the surgery will help us understand how much of these two study drugs actually get into the brain, their effect, and how the tumors become resistant to treatment.

Yes
 

Michael Glantz
psniclinresearch@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
Neurosurgery (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00010083
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Inclusion Criteria:
At least 18 years old
Subjects must have a history of primary brain tumor (including but not limited to glioblastoma (GBM), anaplastic astrocytoma (AA), anaplastic ganglioglioma (AG), and anaplastic pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA)).
Subjects must have a BRAF-V600 mutation identified in previous tissue analysis (may be IHC or PCR based). Allowable mutations include V600E, V600K, V600R, and V600D.
Subjects must be taking dabrafenib at a dose of at least 50mg twice daily (adults only) and / or trametinib at a dose of at least 1mg daily (adults only) for at least 7 days prior to surgery as prescribed by their treating physician.
Subjects must be undergoing surgery for clinical purposes

Exclusion Criteria:
Younger than 18 year old
Subjects who are receiving any other investigational agents or chemotherapeutic agents.
Neurology, Cancer
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Hershey, PA ,

Abstract Reasoning, Decision Making and Social Judgment as Markers of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) in Midlife in Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy (JME)

This study will look for emerging patterns of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD), an early onset dementia, in Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy (JME). JME is a type of epilepsy that usually begins in adolescence and is known to be associated with disturbances of higher-level reasoning, mood and personality. JME patients are often managed by family physicians, rather than epilepsy specialists; with little known about aging with JME. We think that JME patients will demonstrate a pattern of executive dysfunction that is consistent with consensus criteria for FTLD, characterized by declines in abstract reasoning, judgment, and verbal problem solving, as well as behavior. We also think that there will be an inverse relationship between apathy and conscientiousness. We plan to obtain this information by formal cognitive testing of non-demented JME patients over a period of 2 years, at 6-month intervals, to look for progression of symptoms. Loved ones/caregivers will complete informant questionnaires about patient's mood and personality at the beginning of the study and at 6 month intervals throughout the duration of the 24 month study. We will also include loved one/caregiver cognitive testing at the beginning of the study to obtain healthy information for comparison to patient's findings. Our objectives are to characterize the executive functioning profiles of JME in midlife, taking into account cognition, mood, personality, nutritional status and lifestyle. The information obtained may contribute to better care of JME patients prior to midlife and throughout the course of aging.

Visit 1 for both patient and healthy caregiver participants will involve administration of the JME Virtual Visit Protocol via PSH Zoom. Participants will have completed their REDCap questionnaires prior to the visit to the research coordinator, who will be conducting the assessment. Visit 2-5 for patient participants will involve administration of the JME Virtual Visit Protocol via PSH Zoom. JME participation consists of 5 virtual visits with the study’s research coordinator, lasting approximately two hours each, for completion of standardized tests of problem-solving, thinking, and concentration, as defined above. Caregiver healthy control participation consists of 1 virtual visit with the study’s research coordinator, lasting approximately two hours, for completion of standardized tests of problem-solving, thinking, and concentration, as defined above. Remaining participation involves completion of objective inventories providing a caregiver perspective of the patient participant’s mood and behavior at 6-month intervals, within the 24 month time frame of the study.

No
 

Claire Flaherty
Meghan Grubb - at mgrubb1@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-1804
Neurology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00016306
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Inclusion Criteria:
JME in the absence of any other neurological condition
Primary language English
age 45 - 65
Mainstream Education
Loved one or caregiver to complete questionnaires

Exclusion Criteria:
Neurological conditions other than JME, including history of head trauma
Cardiac conditions affecting cognition
Other medical conditions affecting cognition,e.g.,hypoglycemia
Hospitalization for major depressive disorder within the past year
No available loved one or caregiver to complete questionnaires
Neurology, Mental & Behavioral Health, Language & Linguistics
Not applicable
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Regional Brain Manganese Accumulation and Functional Consequences in Welders

Inhalation of welding fumes has been known to cause tremor, muscle rigidity and abnormal gait similar to what is seen in Parkinson's disease. Previous studies by the Translational Brain Research Center have used measures such as brain MRIs and tests for movement and function to investigate the effect of these welding fumes on brain health in active welders. The center is currently expanding its efforts to investigate brain health in retired welders.This is an independent study sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, with no affiliation to any private entities such as law firms.In this study participants will be asked to undergo clinical tests (blood draw, motor examination, memory tests), complete lifestyle questionnaires, and undergo an MRI scan during a baseline and 18 month follow-up visit. Participants also will be mailed a welding exposure questionnaire to complete every three months between their baseline and follow-up visit.

Participants will attend a screening call with the study team, an in-person baseline visit and an in-person follow up visit (at 18 months). Participants will complete questionnaires, undergo clinical tests (blood draw, motor evaluations, memory tests), and undergo MRI scan. Participants will also have the option to complete mobile phone assessments and undergo four skin punch biopsies.

Up to $750 per participant

Yes
 

Xuemei Huang
Amanda Snyder - at TBRC@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5233
Neurology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00005467
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Inclusion Criteria:
Active or retired welder (e.g., boilermaker, pipefitter, etc.)
No obvious signs of parkinsonism (e.g., tremor, impaired speech)
Fluent in written and spoken English
No metal eye fragments
Able to tolerate a brain MRI

Exclusion Criteria:
Severe memory impairment or signs of dementia
Claustrophobia or unwillingness to undergo an MRI
Significant medical and neurological deficits (e.g., brain tumor, seizures, stroke, etc.)
Significant recreational drug use or alcohol abuse
History of chronic paint and solvent exposure
Neurology
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Hershey, PA ,

Concussion-Diagnosis

The purpose of this research is to use saliva swab as a tool to diagnosis concussions and be able to differentiate a concussion and other medical conditions with the similar symptoms.

During their baseline visit participants will complete a saliva swab &amp; surveys.Day 7, participants will complete a saliva swab and 2 surveys.Day 30, participants will complete a saliva swab and 4 surveys.The baseline visit is the only in-person visit, day 7 and day 30 are done remotely.All surveys are completed online and day 7 and day 30 saliva swabs are sent home with the participants and sent back in a prepaid mailer on day 30.

$20

Yes
 

Jayson Loeffert
Brennen Harding - at bharding@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5656
Family and Community Medicine (HERSHEY)
 

All
All
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
SITE00000814
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Inclusion Criteria:
13-22 years old
Diagnosis of concussion

Exclusion Criteria:
< 72hrs after TBI
Children's Health, Neurology, Sports Medicine
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Hershey, PA ,

Monetary Reward Processing and Emotion Regulation in Adolescence: An fMRI pilot Study

This research is being done to identify patterns of brain activation underlying monetary reward processing and emotion regulation in adolescence, as well as correspondence between parent and adolescent neural activation.Children and their parents will complete questionnaires. Children will complete computer tasks during EEG and in an MRI scanner. Parents can also complete the MRI scan if interested.

Yes
 

Dara Babinski
Michael West - at ABC@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-0003, ext=285968
Psychiatry and Behavioral Health (HERSHEY)
 

All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00008393
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Inclusion Criteria:
Ages 12--16 years
Fluent in English
No history of treatment for psychiatric disorders

Exclusion Criteria:
Intellectual or developmental disabilities
Visual or hearing impairments
Inability to complete MRI scan due a pacemaker, aneurysm clips or any metal in body (e.g., braces, surgical devices)
Currently pregnant or lactating
Neurological disease (e.g., stroke, tumor, Parkinson’s disease, etc.)
Children's Health, Neurology, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Hershey, PA ,

Home telemonitoring of bulbar function by acoustic measurement of swallowing and speech sounds in ALS

Most individuals with ALS experience changes in speech and swallowing over the course of the disease. In some, these are their initial indication of ALS. Identifying these changes, which may be rapid in some individuals, is complicated by the recent acceleration of virtual care delivery. This is a longitudinal home study of ALS patients to assess speech and swallowing function through use of smartphone application. The overall hypothesis is that this monitoring protocol can be used in a way that, 1) is satisfactory to the patient, 2) performs at least as well as standard clinical measures of dysarthria and dysphagia, and 3) resolves the development of emergence of speech and swallowing pathologies in ALS. Patients enrolling in this study will participate for approximately 24 weeks, during which they will have swallowing and speech tests performed, complete surveys, and perform audio recordings of speech on their cellphone. Healthy controls will be enrolled to judge the intelligibility of speech samples provided by patients in the study.

Patients enrolling in this study will participate for approximately 24 weeks, during which they will have swallowing and speech tests performed, complete surveys, and perform audio recordings of speech on a cellphone.

340

Yes
 

Andrew Geronimo
Cristie Crawford - at ccrawford5@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
Neurosurgery (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT04889898
STUDY00016872
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Inclusion Criteria:
At least 18 years of age
Possess a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
Have symptom onset within the last 6 years
Demonstrate changes in speech or swallowing as a result of ALS.
Possess a smartphone capable of running the study application or have home wireless internet service capable of transmitting study data from a study-issued smartphone.

Exclusion Criteria:
Possess a co-existing neurological or psychiatric illness in addition to their ALS diagnosis
Possess abnormal speech or swallowing processes due to a condition independent of their ALS diagnosis
Neurology, Language & Linguistics
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See this study on ClinicalTrials.gov
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Hershey, PA ,
State College, PA ,

Muscular Dystrophy Association Neuromuscular Observational Research (MOVR) Data Hub Protocol

The Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) wants to collect information about individuals with neuromuscular disease to better understand the disease progression and ultimately improve the medical care, quality of life, and survival of those with neuromuscular disease. To collect this information, MDA has created a data registry called the Neuromuscular Observational Research Data Hub (referred to as the “MOVR Data Hub”). The MOVR Data Hub is a kind of database — a way of collecting and storing information.

Each person who participates in the MOVR Data Hub will have his/her information collected for as long as the person is being seen at an MDA Care Center and information is still being collected, unless and until the person requests that the information no longer be provided to the MOVR Data Hub.

Yes
 

Mansoureh Mamarabadi
Cristie Crawford - at ccrawford5@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-0003, ext=322992
Neurology (HERSHEY)
 

All
All
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00012883
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Inclusion Criteria:
Diagnosed with a neuromuscular condition

Exclusion Criteria:
Unwilling to provide informed consent
Neurology
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Hershey, PA ,

Atrophy of Olfactory Bulb in Early-stage Parkinson’s disease

This research is being done to study the deterioration of the central olfactory system (sense of smell system) in the brains of patients diagnosed with early- stage Parkinson’s disease.

Yes
 

Jian-Li Wang
Jianli Wang - at jwang2@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
Radiology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00005422
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Inclusion Criteria:
A physician-documented parkinsonian symptom onset between the ages of 40-59 will
Patients should not have reached their 65th birthday.
Patients that have tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia unilaterally

Exclusion Criteria:
Dementia
Autonomic dysfunction
Parkinson-plus syndrome
Postural instability
History of exposure to substances that cause parkinsonism
Neurology
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Hershey, PA ,

Asymmetric neurodegeneration of central olfactory system in early-stage Parkinson’s disease

This research is being done to study the deterioration of the central olfactory system (sense of smell system) in the brains of patients diagnosed with H&amp;Y stage 1 or 2 Parkinson’s disease compared to that of healthy volunteers.

In this study, you will receive a clinical evaluation and an MRI examination. After that, you will be followed every 12 months for up to 4 years.

up to a total of $250.00.

Yes
 

Jian-Li Wang
Heather Klemick - at hklemick@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-0003, ext=323023
Radiology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00005378
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Inclusion Criteria:
Cognitively-normal H&Y stage 1 PD patients. A physician-documented parkinsonian symptom onset between the ages of 40-59. 1st visit prior to age 65. PD stage I diagnosis must be documented for a min of 2 years.
Cognitively-normal H&Y stage 2 PD patients. H&Y stage 2, as defined by an exam in the practically defined “off” state, and have a diagnosis of PD at the age of 59 or younger. 1st visit prior to age 65
Healthy participants between ages 40-64 at their first visit.
Able and willing to provide informed consent
Fluent in written and spoken English

Exclusion Criteria:
Parkinson-plus syndrome
Dementia
Previous antipsychotic or anti-dopamine drug therapy
Traumatic head injury
Other neurological diseases or disorders
Neurology
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Hershey, PA ,

Defining the role of slow eye movements on limb motor control

The purpose of the study is to examine how slow eye movements called smooth-pursuit eye movements, contribute to hand-eye coordination. Participants will grasp a robotic manipulandum and using the manipulandum interact with virtual visual stimuli in an augmented-reality environment.

Yes
 

Tarkeshwar Singh
Tarkesh Singh - at tsingh@psu.edu or 814-865-7851
Kinesiology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00018339
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Inclusion Criteria:
Right-handed individuals (males and females) between 18-65 years of age
Should have normal vision or corrected vision
Participants should be able to sit upright on a chair for upto 2 hours
Participants should be able to grasp and move objects with their right hand
Participants should be able to provide informed consent

Exclusion Criteria:
History of neurological disorders (Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s (e.g., Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis or Lou Gehrig’s disease, Friedreich's ataxia, aneurism, brain tumor, epilepsy, suffered a concussion in the last 5 years, TBI, stroke)
History of musculoskeletal disorders (e.g., carpal tunnel syndrome, arthritis, fibromyalgia, tendinitis, trigger finger, mallet finger, fracture, or previous injury to the bones or joints in your neck, upper back, arms or hands in the last six months)
eye or vision problems (e.g., cataracts, glaucoma, a detached retina or macular degeneration)
Cognitive impairment such that informed consent cannot be obtained.
Medication that could make the participant either drowsy or tired. Individuals who get tired with 2 hours of mild to moderate exercise are also not eligible to participate.
Neurology, Vision & Eyes
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State College, PA ,

Remote pulmonary function testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

The specific objective of this proposal is to validate the practice of remote pulmonary function testing (rPFT) through home measurement of breathing function. The central hypothesis is that guided home assessment of breathing function is a valid method for detecting respiratory distress. This study has the potential to transform the current practice of conducting breathing assessments every three months, resulting in timelier detection and management of respiratory distress.The study has two parts.[CLOSED TO ENROLLMENT] The first part is a self-controlled study which will enroll 40 patients from the ALS clinic. On the day of their clinical visit, study participants will perform both a standard PFT with a respiratory therapist and a simulated rPFT. The primary hypothesis is that there is no difference in the results of PFT and rPFT.The second part is a two-arm randomized intervention in 40 patients with ALS. All subjects will perform weekly home respiratory testing for up to a year, and complete questionnaires at regular intervals during this period. Part 2 also incorporates a nurse health coaching component, with subjects randomized to a group that recieves monthly nurse coaching, and one that does not.

Yes
 

Andrew Geronimo
Wint Nandar - at wnandar@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
Neurosurgery (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00006924
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Inclusion Criteria:
Possess a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
Be 18 years of age or older.
Have a caregiver available to assist with home PFTs or, in the opinion of the investigator, can perform home PFTs unassisted.
Symptom onset within the last three years.
Have an internet-capable home computer and cellphone.

Exclusion Criteria:
Inability to perform pulmonary function testing with mouthpiece or with mask, as determined by one of the study investigators.
Neurology
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Hershey, PA ,

Implementation of a Transcutaneous CO2 Monitoring (ITCOM) Study in ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) leads to respiratory failure due to chronic hypoventilation. The gold standard for measuring hypoventilationrequires an arterial blood gas, which is impractical in the outpatient setting due to invasiveness, pain, and need for specialized equipment. Recently, the Penn State Health Hershey ALS Clinic has implemented transcutaneous CO2 (TCO2) monitoring as standard of care clinical assessment. The overall goals of this study are to gather critical preliminary data for stakeholder-driven refinement of a TCO2 monitoring protocol within a busy ALS clinic and identify how TCO2 may enhance our understanding of standard respiratory measurements.

Participants will complete a survey related to their experience having their CO2 reading performed in the ALS Clinic.

$20 will be paid for every survey completed, for a maximum possible payment of $80 per person.

Yes
 

Andrew Geronimo
Cristie Crawford - at ccrawford5@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
Neurosurgery (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00022352
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Inclusion Criteria:
Diagnosis of ALS based on Gold Coast Criteria.
18 years of age or older.
Seated forced vital capacity (FVC) of less than 100% predicted normal.

Exclusion Criteria:
Inability to perform FVC due to severe bulbar weakness
Use of any type of non-invasive ventilation, except in the case of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea
Use of diaphragm pacer
Use of a tracheostomy
In hospice or in active transition to hospice
Neurology
Survey(s)
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Hershey, PA ,

Identifying the Cognitive, Psychological, and Neuroimaging Signatures of Head Trauma in Female Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

The overall purpose of this study is to examine the effects of sub-acute and chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hypoxic brain injury (HBI) on neural networks, cognitive, and psychological outcomes in individuals who have experienced intimate partner violence (IPV). Participants will be asked to complete a series of cognitive tests and a brain imaging scan.

The study includes interviews to discuss your any experiences you have had with physical abuse and head trauma, as well as current and past mental health history. Then you will complete questionnaires to see how you feel about your mental and physical health, followed by tests to assess your thinking abilities. Finally you will complete a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) session to examine brain structure and function. All of the testing should take approximately 6 hours to complete.

$90

Yes
 

Frank Hillary
Elizabeth Rebuck - at exr5373@psu.edu or 814-865-0389
Psychology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
SITE00000844
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Inclusion Criteria:
Female
Aged 18-60
Has previously experienced intimate partner violence

Exclusion Criteria:
Male
Currently experiencing intimate partner violence (within the past 3 months)
Non-English speaker
Neurological and developmental disorders
Neurology, Mental & Behavioral Health, Women's Health
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Altoona, PA ,
Hershey, PA ,
State College, PA ,

A data and biorepository for individuals with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia, and other individuals at increased risk for dementia

This research is being done to help us better understand the risk factors and protective factors for cognitive decline in people who are at increased risk for dementia. The goal of the study is to establish a data and biorepository for people at increased risk for dementia.

Eligible patients for the study, in addition to routine clinic visits, may undergo a series of questionnaires and blood testing.

Yes
 

William Jens
psniclinresearch@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
Neurology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00015640
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age 18 and older
Patient participants - Meet the criteria for subjective cognitive decline, mild cognitive impairment, dementia or at risk for any
Health controls - Normal age and education-adjusted performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Test or another standardized cognitive screening test

Exclusion Criteria:
Age less than 18
Neurology
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Hershey, PA ,