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39 Study Matches

Prevalence of Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) traits among children and adolescents with Food Allergy

This study looks at understanding eating behaviors and attitudes toward food in children/adolescents. More specifically the study's goal is to compare those with and without food allergies to gain a better understanding of a possible underlying factor towards certain behaviors. Children and their caregivers will complete a survey composed of a short section on the child's medical history regarding allergies followed with questions in commonly used clinical assessments.

No
 

Jodi Brady-Olympia
Jodi Brady-Olympia - at jbradyolympia@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-1383
Pediatrics: General Pediatrics (HERSHEY)
 

All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00015831
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Inclusion Criteria:
Ages 8-17

Exclusion Criteria:
Age under 8 years old
Age 18 years or older
Intellectual disability preventing comprehension of questions
Child and/or caregiver unable to respond to English-language questionnaire
Children's Health, Allergies, Food & Nutrition
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Brain Mechanisms of Overeating in Children

Reducing intake from large portions is of critical importance to preventing obesity. People consistently eat more when they are served larger portions, a phenomenon known as the portion size effect. The mechanisms of the portion size effect are not well understood, and investigating the underlying neurobiology that drives this phenomenon may inform the development of more effective obesity prevention programs. The proposed research will follow healthy weight children who vary by family risk for obesity to identify the neurobiological and appetitive traits that are implicated in overeating and weight gain during the critical pre-adolescent period. We expect results to confirm the hypothesis that reduced function of brain inhibitory pathways and increased activity in brain reward pathways in response to portion size cues contributes to excess intake with large portions and greater weight gain over time, particularly in children who have higher risk for obesity. The proposed studies will characterize the relationship between brain response to portion size and eating behavior and will allow us to determine whether brain and behavioral responses predict body fat gain during pre-adolescence. These studies will contribute essential information to our understanding of the pathways implicated in overeating and obesity and will facilitate the characterization of “at risk” phenotypes that can be targeted by prevention programs.

There will be seven in person visits with two DEXA measurements, one fMRI scan and five meals.

$350

Yes
 

Kathleen Keller
Kyle Hallisky - at kmh6587@psu.edu or 814-865-5169
Nutritional Sciences (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT03341247
STUDY00005357
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Inclusion Criteria:
The child must be age 7-8 when the first study visit is completed
The child must not have any food allergies to foods used in the study, learning disabilities, psychological diagnoses, red/green color blindness, or claustrophobia.
The child must not be taking any medications known to influence cognitive function, taste, appetite or blood flow
The child's BMI must be below the 90th percentile at the first visit
The biological mother and father must have a BMI between 18.5-25 kg/m2 (low-risk group) or greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 for mothers and greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2 for fathers (high-risk group) and 1 parent must attend all visits.

Exclusion Criteria:
Children will be excluded if they are not within the age requirements (< than 7 years old or > than 8 years-old at the first visit).
Children will be excluded if they have any food allergies, learning disabilities, psychological diagnoses, red/green color blindness, or claustrophobia
Children will be excluded if they are taking cold or allergy medication, or other medications known to influence cognitive function, taste, appetite, or blood flow
Children will be excluded if their BMI is above the 90th percentile at the first visit
Families will be excluded if the biological mother or father do not fit the BMI requirements
Food & Nutrition, Prevention, Neurology
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State College, PA ,

Investigation of pulse starch impact on the gut microbiome

We are investigating how the starch from pulse crops (chickpeas, lentils and dry peas) affects the gut microbiome, particularly with regards to the production of butyrate, a microbial metabolite with a number of known health benefits. We are recruiting people from two groups, those that consume a lot of these pulses and those who rarely consume them. These participants will then track their food intake for 48 hours before collecting a fecal sample which they will return to the lab. We will then use these fecal samples to conduct laboratory fermentations with pulse starches processed in a number of different ways to see what factors are important for determining the amount of butyrate that is produced. This will serve as pilot data for designing future human clinical trials.

Yes
 

Darrell Cockburn
Darrell Cockburn - at dwc30@psu.edu or 814-863-2950
Food Science (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00013284
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Inclusion Criteria:
18-65 years of age
Either consume pulses twice or more per week or consume them once a month or less. Pulses are dry legumes such as chickpeas(Garbanzo beans), lentils or other dry peas and beans

Exclusion Criteria:
Currently or in the past month taking antibiotics
Taking a fiber supplement
Bowel problems such as IBD, IBS, chronic diarrhea or constipation
Pregnancy
Food & Nutrition
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State College, PA ,

Measuring the impact of three types of resistant starch on fecal butyrate levels and the gut microbiome in healthy and obese individuals

This is dietary intervention trial that will examine the impact of consuming three different types of resistant starch on the gut microbiome and butyrate levels in normal weight and obese individuals. Participants will consume starch samples daily for 24 weeks, collecting weekly fecal samples that will be returned to the lab. Researchers will analyze the bacterial fermentation products in these samples, particularly butyrate and analyze the microbiome composition. This will allow identification of differences in resistant starch (a dietary fiber) processing between normal weight and obese individuals and will also determine if the three resistant starches tested have differing impacts on the microbiome and butyrate levels.

Yes
 

Darrell Cockburn
Darrell Cockburn - at dwc30@psu.edu
Food Science (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00008824
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Inclusion Criteria:
BMI greater than 30

Exclusion Criteria:
Diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Diagnosis of Diabetes
Pregnant
Taking antibiotics
Food & Nutrition
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State College, PA ,

AWS-PSU: Active Women's Study at Penn State University

AWS-PSU: Active Women's Study at Penn State University This research study is being conducted to evaluate the impact of exercise and reproductive function on bone strength. Eligible young women (age 18-30) are those that are generally healthy and either a) exercising and experiencing regular or irregular menstrual cycles, or b) not exercising and experiencing regular menstrual cycles.

Yes
 

Mary Jane De Souza
Nicole Aurigemma - at nca11@psu.edu or 814-863-4488
Kinesiology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
PRAMS00043507
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Inclusion Criteria:
Regular or irregular menstrual cycles
Age 18-30
BMI between 16-29.9
No hormonal contraception for 6 months

Exclusion Criteria:
Smoking
Currently using medication impacting bone
Food & Nutrition, Muscle & Bone, Women's Health
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State College, PA ,

Examining contextual factors associated with food-related reward and eating restraint

Rates of obesity have risen sharply throughout the world over the past several decades. The increase in the availability of highly palatable, high-calorie foods may be one factor that has contributed to this trend. That is, the availability of such foods may lead to their over-consumption and corresponding weight gain. Currently, relatively little is known about how the availability of foods, per se, affects things such as the motivation to eat and the ability to resist doing so. The current study is designed to help address this knowledge gap by examining the effects of food availability in people with high levels of dietary restraint. Dietary restraint, which refers to the intention to restrict food intake deliberately in order to prevent weight gain or to promote weight, is linked to problematic patterns of eating. This project uses laboratory tasks and brain imaging to study the effects of food availability on various outcomes, including food choices, food craving, and responses in brain areas linked to motivation.

Participants will be asked to fill out some online questionnaires and complete some computerized behavioral tasks. They will be asked to attend a one-hour virtual screening/baseline session via Zoom, and a 3-hour MRI session in the Penn State campus, University Park. In the MRI session, participants will be performing on a task involving asking them to view a series of colorful food pictures inside an MRI scanner while their brain activity is being scanned.

80

Yes
 

Stephen Wilson
Josie Huang - at suh438@psu.edu or 814-867-2333
Psychology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00011432
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Inclusion Criteria:
Participants must be between the ages of 18 and 45.
Participants must be right handed.
Participants must be fluent English speakers.
Participants must have a body mass index (BMI) >= 25.
Participants must have experienced food eating/weight issues.

Exclusion Criteria:
If participants are currently engaging in active dieting behaviors (e.g., a weight loss program) or they are taking medications that could alter appetite or body weight.
If participant have a lifetime history of diagnosed eating disorders, diabetes, hyperglycemia, high levels of triglycerides, or high cholesterol or other related medical conditions.
If participants have any known risk from exposure to high-field strength magnetic fields (e.g., pace makers), any irremovable metallic foreign objects in their body (e.g., braces), or a questionable history of metallic fragments.
If participants report that they are vegetarian/vegan.
If participants are not willing to refrain from using alcohol for 24 hours or from using nicotine products/recreational drugs for 3 weeks, or unwilling to fast from food for 5 hours prior to two of three lab visits.
Food & Nutrition, Mental & Behavioral Health
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State College, PA ,

Effect of Nitrate Supplementation on Cerebrovascular function and Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Metabolic Syndrome

The aim of this study is to determine the impact of cardiometabolic disease risk factors on cognitive performance and brain vascular function, as well as, to see if beetroot juice supplementation can improve these outcomes and reduce risk of cognitive decline and brain vascular dysfunction that is seen with aging and disease.

Participants with and without high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and high blood sugar will be recruited. These are all considered cardiovascular disease risk factors.Individuals without multiple cardiovascular disease risk factors will have 2 visits and complete cognitive and blood vessel function assessments. There involves a blood draw in each visit. All study assessments are non-invasive. Total compensation is $30. Individuals with cardiovascular disease risk factors will have 5 total visits and complete cognitive and blood vessel function assessments. Additionally, participants will drink beetroot juice for 4 weeks to determine the potential health benefits on cognitive, blood vessel function, and metabolic health. There will involve blood draws and all assessments are non-invasive. Total compensation is up to $170.

$30 -170

Yes
 

David Proctor
Jigar Gosalia - at jzg691@psu.edu or 516-816-1654
Kinesiology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT05532423
STUDY00020830
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age 55 - 75
high blood pressure and/or high cholesterol and/or high cholesterol
the above criteria does not apply for the control group

Exclusion Criteria:
Smoking
Severe visual impairment
Individuals with any overt cardiovascular, hematologic, pulmonary, renal, musculoskeletal, and/or neurological disease(s)
Food & Nutrition, Heart & Vascular, Women's Health
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State College, PA ,

Sleep and eating behaviors in rural preadolescent children (Tween SPACE [Sleep Patterns, Appetite Control, and Environment])

The goal of this study is to learn about how children's sleep is related to their eating behaviors the next day. We are also interested in learning about factors that relate to eating behaviors and sleep health that are specific to preadolescent children living in rural communities. Participants will complete two virtual study visits via Zoom, answer surveys, and wear sleep and physical activity monitors for 2 weeks in their own homes.

- Study materials will be mailed to participants- Parent and child will attend a Zoom visit with a researcher to go over study procedures and measure child's height and weight- Child will wear a sleep monitor on their wrist and physical activity monitor around their waist continuously for 14 days- Child will attend a second Zoom visit to complete questionnaires- Parent will complete an online survey- Participants will return study materials via provided, prepaid shipping packaging

$200

No
 

Emily Hohman
Emily Hohman - at tweenspace@psu.edu or 814-865-5245
Center for Childhood Obesity Research (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00020663
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Inclusion Criteria:
Children age 8-12
Living in a rural zip code in United States (as defined by Health Resources & Services Administration)
Child BMI-for-age >=85th percentile OR BMI-for-age >=15th percentile plus one biological parent with overweight
Able to read and answer questions in English

Exclusion Criteria:
Medical conditions that significantly impact eating, sleep or growth (e.g. eating disorder)
Unable to connect to Zoom session via internet or cell-phone data
Unable to receive and sign for package with study supplies
Parent/child living in the same household as a previous or current participant in the study
Children's Health, Food & Nutrition, Sleep Management
Not applicable
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Mindful Moms study

This study (Mindful Moms) is being done to understand how an 8-week app-based mindfulness program called Calm impacts breastfeeding and maternal well-being. Eligible participants will be asked to complete three online surveys (each survey will take about 20 minutes) and take part in an 8-week app-based mindfulness program. Eligible participants will also be asked to take part in one online interview that will take about 25-30 minutes once the mindfulness program is over.

Participants will take part in one of two groups: A group asked to take part in a free 8-week app-based mindfulness program on their smartphone starting when they are 36 weeks pregnant or 4 weeks after delivery. The program will teach participants about mindfulness and breathing strategies to assist with calming their mind and body. or A group asked to take part in a free 8-week app-based mindfulness program on your smartphone starting 4 weeks or 12 weeks after they deliver. The program will teach participants about mindfulness and breathing strategies to assist with calming their mind and body. Participants will also be asked to complete three online surveys (each survey will take about 20 minutes) and take part in one online interview that will take about 25-30 minutes once the mindfulness program is over.

$130

No
 

Amy Moore
Amy Moore - at amm9107@psu.edu or 814-865-6714
Center for Childhood Obesity Research (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00018380
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Inclusion Criteria:
18 years of age or older
currently pregnant (12 to 34 weeks) or recently delivered (within the past 4 weeks)
intend to or are currently breastfeeding
daily access to a smartphone
willing to download a free mobile app

Exclusion Criteria:
have a current daily meditation practice
Food & Nutrition, Pregnancy & Infertility, Women's Health
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Longitudinal Associations Between Food Insecurity, Diet, Mental Health, Sleep and Academic Outcomes in College Students

This is a questionnaire study that seeks to discover the prevalence of food insecurity at PSU's University Park campus over the course of a semester and the relationship between long-term food insecurity and academic outcomes, as mediated by mental health and sleep outcomes.

No
 

Muzi Na
Kiara Smith - at kxs782@psu.edu
Nutritional Sciences (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00015990
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Inclusion Criteria:
Must be a Penn State student at University park
Must be in their 2nd semester during Spring 2021
Must have internet access
Must be at least 18 years old
Must not have children or other dependents

Exclusion Criteria:
Has diagnosed learning or mental disabilities
Has diagnosed mental disorders
Is unable to read, write or understand English fluently
Food & Nutrition, Sleep Management, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Characterizing resilience to food-cue induced overeating in children

This is a behavioral and neuroimaging study that will examine how food commercials affect the way a child eats and responds to food. Children enrolled in the study will complete 5 in-lab sessions that include eating meals and snacks, watching TV, and playing computer games. For one of these sessions, children will complete an fMRI scan. On the first and last visit to the lab, children will receive a DXA scan to assess their body composition.

We are looking for children to help us learn about how kids respond to different types of foods and food advertisements. The study consists of 5 visits to our facilities in Noll and Chandlee Labs, located on the University Park Campus. For 3 visits your child will eat test meals and snack buffets in our laboratory. On 1 visit we will use fMRI to take pictures of your child’s brain. We will use a DXA to scan for lean muscle and conduct an IQ test. These procedures are not harmful. You and your child will fill out questionnaires.Your child will also play computer games and watch commercials.

$250.00-450.00

Yes
 

Kathleen Keller
Jonathan Bauman - at jmb7118@psu.edu or 814-865-9841
Nutritional Sciences (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT05073185
STUDY00015835
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Inclusion Criteria:
In order to be enrolled, children must be of good health based on parental self-report.
Be 7-9 years-old at enrollment.
Not be taking any medications known to influence body weight, taste, food intake, behavior, or blood flow.
Have no learning disabilities (e.g., ADHD).
The biological mother must have a body mass index either between 18.5 - 25 kg/m2 (low-risk group) or greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 (high-risk group).

Exclusion Criteria:
They are not within the age requirements (< than 7 years old or > than 9 years-old at baseline).
If they have a learning disability, ADD/ADHD, language delays, autism or other neurological or psychological conditions.
If they have a pre-existing medical condition such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, Cushing’s syndrome, Down’s syndrome, severe lactose intolerance, Prader-Willi syndrome, HIV, cancer, renal failure, cerebral palsy, or can't engage in moderate exercise.
If they don’t speak English.
Biological mother must have a body mass index either between 18.5 - 25 kg/m2 (low-risk group) or greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 for mothers (high-risk group), or they are excluded.
Children's Health, Food & Nutrition, Prevention
Not applicable
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State College, PA ,

Study of Angelica gigas dietary supplements (Cogni.Q) and potential effects on human immune cells

This human study will test the impact of dietary supplement vegicaps containing Korean Angelica root extract on 2 types of human immune cells: neutrophils that kill bacteria and other germs and natural killer (NK) cells that kill virus-infected cells and cancers. We had done an earlier study with Korean Angelica supplement and discovered even a single dose of it increased blood neutrophils and NK cells within 24 h. In the new study, Korean Angelica capsules (Cogni.Q) will be compared head-to-head with dummy (placebo) capsules. This is to make sure the immune boosting actions are really from the Korean Angelica supplement.Approximately 40 men will take part in this research study at Hershey Medical Center.

Yes
 

Junxuan Lu
Deepkamal Karelia - at dkarelia@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-0003, ext=285476
Pharmacology (HERSHEY)
 

Male
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00008009
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Inclusion Criteria:
Male subjects 21 to 65 years of age
Subjects weighing between 110 to 240 pounds; their body mass index (BMI) should be in the range of 19=< BMI >=30
Subjects having normal hepatic, renal function as assessed by history, physical and clinical chemistry analysis (CMP eGFR).
Subjects with normal blood pressure (systolic below 120 mm Hg and diastolic below 80 mm Hg)

Exclusion Criteria:
Subjects positive for HIV, HBV and HCV (self-reported)
Subjects taking any kind of prescription medications regularly or within 10 days of the study will be excluded.
Subjects taking dietary or herbal supplements that contain AGN (e.g. Cogni.Q, Decursinol-50, Ache Action, Fast-Acting Joint Formula, EstroG-100/Profemin) within 10 days of the study.
Non-English-speaking subjects
Infectious Diseases & Immune System, Blood Disorders, Food & Nutrition
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Hershey, PA ,

Penn State Exercising Women's Study

This study aims to assess energy status in young sedentary and exercising women as it is related to menstrual status, bone health, psychological health, sleep variables, and cardiovascular function.

There will be three to four visits to the laboratory. Procedures include questionnaires, a blood draw, providing a hair sample, providing two saliva samples, cardiovascular measurements, and bone scans, as well as resting metabolic rate, cognitive, aerobic fitness, and countermovement jump testing. Participants will be asked to collect urine samples throughout one menstrual cycle, or 28 days for amenorrheic females. Exercise and physical activity will be recorded and monitored for seven days via logs and wearables. Food intake will be recorded for three days. Collegiate athletes will be tested twice; in-season and off-season.

Yes
 

Mary Jane De Souza
Ana Carla Chierighini Salamunes - at akc6247@psu.edu or 814-863-4488
Kinesiology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00019437
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Inclusion Criteria:
Women
Age 18-30 years
Body Mass Index between 16-29.9 kg/m2
For sedentary participants: less than 2 hours of purposeful exercise per week and regular menstrual cycles for the last 6 months (i.e. cycles between 26 and 35 days in length)
For exercising participants: exercise at least 2 hours per week AND/OR participate in collegiate athletics. Exercising participants can have regular or irregular menstrual cycles for the last 6 months.

Exclusion Criteria:
Pregnant or lactating
Currently a smoker or history of regular smoking
Taking any hormonal medication in the past six months, other than oral contraceptives
Serious or chronic health condition (including heart condition, thyroid illness, metabolic disease)
Hysterectomy or oophorectomy
Food & Nutrition, Muscle & Bone, Women's Health
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State College, PA ,

The Child Health Study

We want to understand how a child's environment affects biology in ways that impact child health

The project involves completing three Penn State ChildHealth Days on the University Park Campus in StateCollege, PA 2 years apart. Your child will receive a comprehensivehealth screening and you will be asked to completeseveral assessments about your child’s physical healthand emotional well-being. Travel and hotel costs arefree for eligible families.

520

Yes
 

Hannah Schreier
Finnley Christine - at childhealthstudy@psu.edu or 888-924-4535
Biobehavioral Health (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00006550
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Inclusion Criteria:
Children 8-13 years of age
Speak and understand English
Participation of a legal guardian

Exclusion Criteria:
Intellectual or learning disability
Children's Health, Food & Nutrition, Education
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State College, PA ,

Stressors under food insecurity and short-term cognitive change in rural older adults

The study is recruiting older adults of age 60 or older in rural Central Pennsylvania to track their food insecurity, diet, mood, stress and cognitive functions in two seasonal months in the winter and in the summer. Each day, participants will use a provided survey phone to answer the survey questions on food situations, mood and stress (20-30 mins) and diet (10 - 30 mins). Participants will also be asked to complete the short cognitive assessments (&lt;3 mins) on smart phones. Following the social distancing guideline during COVID-19 pandemic, remote virtual training will be provided via Zoom and device pick-up and return will be via USPS services. All data collection will take place at participant's home. Up to $400 study compensation in check will be provided.

There will be up to two in-person trainings. Participants will be provided a smartphone for data collection. Each data collection period last for a month. There are up to two months of data collection periods. All data collection will take place at participants' home using the provided smartphone.

Up to $400

No
 

Muzi Na
Muzi Na - at mzn69@psu.edu or 814-865-2919
Nutritional Sciences (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00017905
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Inclusion Criteria:
Adults aged 60 years and older
No difficulty with activities of daily living
Connected to internet at home

Exclusion Criteria:
Has any health conditions that compromise survival
Has any diagnosed neurodegenerative diseases
Has significant cognitive impairment
Has a chronic mental illness
Is heavy drinker of alcohol
Food & Nutrition, Mental & Behavioral Health
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Psychological and Biological Determinants of Eating Disorder Pathology in Endurance and Aesthetic Athletes

The purpose of this study is to investigate psychobiological factors that impact the development and manifestation of eating disorder (ED) pathology in elite male and female athletes before and during their competitive season.

The purpose of this voluntary research study is to assess how changes in stress, cognitive flexibility, response inhibition, and reward delay predict the trajectory of eating disorder behaviors and associated side effects of energy deficiency from the off-season compared to the competitive season. Your participation in this study will last approximately the duration of one season of your sport, specifically 4-weeks of data collection prior to season commencement (baseline), 4-weeks of data collection during peak competition season, and 4-weeks of data collection during off-season. The total time spent in the lab will be approximately 10-14 hours. Procedures will occur three times and measurements will be taken twice following baseline measures (once during the peak competition season, once during off-season), if you agree to do so.

$50

Yes
 

Mary Jane De Souza
Emily Lundstrom - at eal259@psu.edu or 814-863-4488
Kinesiology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00018984
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Inclusion Criteria:
Age 18-25 years
A member of a Penn State NCAA Division 1 Sports team, or Penn State affiliated competitive club team, or competitive community sport team
Exercising without any training modifications that reduce training participation.
non-smoker
No serious of chronic health conditions

Exclusion Criteria:
BMI >32kg/m2 or <16.5 kg/m2
Currently a smoker or history of regular smoking (including nicotine products, e-cigarettes, vaping)
Medications influencing metabolic or endocrine factors (e.g., hormonal use in previous 6 months)
Medical instability or history of psychosis
Vasectomy (male) or Hysterectomy or oophorectomy (female)
Men's Health, Food & Nutrition, Women's Health
Not applicable
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State College, PA ,

Insulitis, Inflammation, Dietary intake and Omega-3 Biostatus of Youth with Partial Remission of Type 1 Diabetes

Only 50% of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) recover insulin secretion function after 3 months of initial diagnosis, and this phase is called partial remission (PR) of T1D, also called "Honeymoon phase". During this PR phase of T1D, patients recover the ability to secrete more than 50% of their insulin secretion function. This phase of PR typically lasts no longer than 6 or up to12 months, and has been frequently defined as requiring exogenous insulin below 0.5 units per kilogram per day, and hemoglobin A1C is typically below 7.5%. Most recently the use of a coefficient called IDAA1C ≤ 9 has became more accepted as the methodology to determine the development of partial clinical remission of T1D (honeymoon phase). Prior data published by the SEARCH study (national epidemiological study) showed that youth with prolonged honeymoon phase had higher intake of omega -3 fatty acids, vitamin D intake and leucine intake than those youth without prolonged honeymoon phase of T1D. Currently, there are not approved medications to prolong this phase of partial remission of type 1 diabetes, however inducing PR in youth with T1D could potentially decrease the risk of multi-organ damage caused by chronic severe hyperglycemia associated to the chronic hyperglycemia related to T1D.We aim to perform a case- multiple control study between youth with prolonged partial remission phase of T1D after one year of diagnosis, and compare these youths with multiple controls matched by age, gender, race, and puberty stage to study the potential protective factors associated to the development of prolonged partial remission of T1D.

Participants will be approached at their routine Pediatric diabetes clinic appointment. If participants agrees to be in the research, informed consent/assent will be reviewed and signed by all parties. Participant's parent/guardian will be asked to complete a questionnaire. The participant's glucose machine/insulin pump will be downloaded for study purposes. Participant will undergo a fingerstick and a blood draw to collect specific lab values as outlined in the consent.

$35.00

Yes
 

Lina Huerta-Saenz
Erica Miller - at emiller25@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-5656
Pediatrics: Endocrinology (HERSHEY)
 

All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00014114
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Inclusion Criteria:
Type 1 diabetes diagnosis for more than one year
Age 1-17 years old, any gender
Attendance to the Pediatric diabetes clinic at Penn State Health in Hershey, PA
Most recent hemoglobin A1C below 7.5%

Exclusion Criteria:
Age older than 17 years old
History of seafood allergies and/or milk/dairy related allergies
Medical conditions (such as severe cerebral palsy, etc.) that could make patients unable to communicate with the study team
Existence of other autoimmune diseases in addition to T1D requiring regular treatment with immunosuppressive or anti-inflammatory treatment
Diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, monogenic diabetes (MODY), secondary diabetes, pregnancy, compromised kidney function, or liver diseases
Children's Health, Food & Nutrition, Diabetes & Hormones
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Carlisle, PA ,
Harrisburg, PA ,
Hershey, PA ,

Nocturnal stress: Psychophysiological mechanisms

This study will examine the relationships among time-of-day, light exposure, and stress markers. Physiological measures of stress will be assessed both in and out of the laboratory using a gold-standard emotion induction task, along with out-of-lab questionnaires and ambulatory sensors.

This is a week-long study consisting of two in-person visits and five out-of-lab days. During the in-person visits, you will be connected to equipment that measures your physiological data and participate in a task with different sounds. During the out-of-lab days, you will wear a sensor that will collect your physiological data and answer questionnaires.

$135

Yes
 

Derek Spangler
Derek Spangler - at dqs6050@psu.edu
Biobehavioral Health (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00020882
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Inclusion Criteria:
No diagnosis of a cardiovascular, metabolic, and/or neurological condition
Not a regular (>1x day) user of nicotine products
Willing to participate in 2 in-lab sessions and 5 out-of-lab days of wearing a sensor
Willing to have gender-matched lab member attach electrodes to the participant while their shirt is removed
Willing to abstain from alcohol use for 24 hours, caffeine consumption for 6 hours, eating for 2 hours, and vigorous exercise for 2 hours prior to the study session

Exclusion Criteria:
Not willing to be exposed to startling and stressful sounds
Not willing to have gender-matched lab member attach electrodes to the participant while their shirt is removed
Not willing/able to wear biosensor at home for 5 consecutive days
Diagnosis of a cardiovascular, metabolic, and/or neurological condition
Regular (>1x day) user of nicotine products
Food & Nutrition, Heart & Vascular, Mental & Behavioral Health
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State College, PA ,

Postmenopausal women and their endothelium: Is dietary nitrate supplementation protective?

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The loss of estrogen from menopause puts women at a greater risk of developing heart disease. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of drinking beetroot juice on measures of blood vessel health and blood pressure. Participants will drink beetroot juice and placebo juice each for one week followed by blood pressure measurements and ultrasound imaging of an artery in the upper arm. A sub-aim of this study is to investigate the effects of estrogen status on blood vessel function between pre- and post-menopausal women.

There are a total of 6 in-person visits to the Clinical Research Center. You will be asked to drink beetroot juice (2 oz) every day for 7 days. Participants will undergo vascular assessments, blood pressure measurements, and blood draws (11 in total for 6 visits).

$120

Yes
 

David Proctor
Jocelyn Delgado - at jmd956@psu.edu or 408-679-8390
Kinesiology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT03644472
STUDY00010017
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Inclusion Criteria:
Post-menopausal women (1-6 years since menopause preferred)
BMI <35
Blood pressure <130/80
LDL <170 mg/dL

Exclusion Criteria:
Individuals taking hormone therapy
Individuals with resting blood pressure > or = 130/80 mmHg
Users of any tobacco and/or nicotine products (smokers, chewing tobacco, nicotine-containing patches/gum, smokeless cigarettes)
Individuals with any overt cardiovascular, metabolic, hematologic, pulmonary, renal, musculoskeletal, and/or neurological disease(s)
Individuals with active cancer
Food & Nutrition, Heart & Vascular, Women's Health
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Altoona, PA ,
State College, PA ,

Slips of Action in Adolescents and Young Adults

Adolescence is a critical period during which many important healthhttps://irb.psu.edu/IRB/sd/ResourceAdministration/Project/ProjectEditor?Project=com.webridge.entity.Entity[OID[058ACDEB3E43384D816C7E390C2B83F6]]&amp;Mode=smartform&amp;WizardPageOID=com.webridge.entity.Entity[OID[E4552FC57E491543A6B7FD8268E23FD7]] habits form in humans. However, animal models provide mixed information about habit formation across development and there are relatively few human studies that address differences between habit formation in adolescents and adults. To address this gap, the proposed study will assess differences in habit formation in adolescents and adults as measured by the "Slips of Action" task, which seeks to discriminate between habitual and goal-directed learning of visual stimuli pairings.

There will be one in-person visit lasting about one hour. Visits will begin with informed consent. Participants will complete a computer task where they are asked to learn associations between pictures and then will be tested on the associated pairings. They will also complete questionnaires and cognitive tasks.

$20

Yes
 

Charles Geier
Katie Meeks - at kxm5964@psu.edu or 814-867-6472
Non-PSU Site
 

All
All
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00020521
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Inclusion Criteria:
Healthy adolescents between the ages of 13 to 17; (health based on parental report)
Healthy adults between the ages of 25 to 40
No learning disabilities (e.g., ADHD) or diagnosed psychological conditions (e.g. anxiety)
Right handed
Not on any medications known to influence behavior

Exclusion Criteria:
Outside of age ranges specified at baseline
Diagnosed neurological or psychological condition including severe anxiety and/or depression, schizophrenia, learning disability, ADD/ADHD, or autism
Significant family history of neurological or psychological disorders
Left handed
Participant is on any medication that may influence behavior
Addiction & Substance Abuse, Food & Nutrition, Mental & Behavioral Health
Not applicable
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State College, PA ,

Califormula Study: Calibrated Formula Feeding to Optimize Infant Growth

This pilot study seeks to determine if formula feeding recommendations that are adjusted using age and weight specific caloric intake recommendations can prevent excessive infant weight gain and reduce overweight in the first 6 months after birth among infants born to mothers with overweight prior to pregnancy electing to exclusively formula feed their infants.

There will be 5-7 visits, where you will record formula volumes on diary cards for a total of 6 days per visit, and be given formula volume recommendations if you are in the intervention group. All participants will complete surveys when their infants are 1 and 6 months of age.

$300

Yes
 

Ian Paul
Courtney Byrnes - at cbyrnes@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-0003, ext=322458
Pediatrics: General Pediatrics (HERSHEY)
 

All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT05104073
STUDY00018788
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Inclusion Criteria:
Formula-fed infants
Term or Early term Infants (≥37 weeks)
Infant birthweight ≥50th percentile

Exclusion Criteria:
Infants who weigh less than their birthweight between 14-21 days after delivery
Children's Health, Food & Nutrition
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Hershey, PA ,

Optimizing Maternal Nutrition: Adaptive trials and molecular methods to improve maternal and newborn health

Poor maternal nutrition is linked to poor birth outcomes. Current vitamin and mineral recommendations in pregnancy are based on limited data mostly from animal models and non-pregnant people. This study seeks to improve our understanding of the amounts of vitamins and minerals that are needed during pregnancy, to improve the health of women and newborns, especially in low-and middle-income countries. Nutrients travel around the body in blood, therefore part of the research is to understand how much blood and the watery component of blood (plasma) increases in pregnancy. This is a collaborative study with George Washington University (lead PI is there). The Penn State team will conduct pilot work to establish a method for measuring plasma volume in 2 phases. In phase 1, nonpregnant will be asked to attend one visit and plasma volume will be measured by injecting indocyanine-green (ICG, a green dye) and hydroxyethyl starch (HES, a form of starch) through an IV in the arm. In phase 2, pregnant women will be asked to attend 2 visits that are 4 weeks apart, but only HES (the starch) will be injected. For both phases (1 and 2), blood draws will occur at each visit and other non-invasive measurements will also be taken (e.g. weight, height, blood pressure). Each visit should take less than 2 hours and will be conducted at the Clinical Research Center in Noll Laboratory on the Penn State campus.

In phase 1, nonpregnant will be asked to attend one visit and plasma volume will be measured by injecting indocyanine-green (ICG, a green dye) and hydroxyethyl starch (HES, a form of starch) through an IV in the arm. In phase 2, pregnant women will be asked to attend 2 visits that are 4 weeks apart, but only HES (the starch) will be injected. For both phases (1 and 2), blood draws will occur at each visit and other non-invasive measurements will also be taken (e.g. weight, height, blood pressure). Each visit should take less than 2 hours and will be conducted at the Clinical Research Center in Noll Laboratory on the Penn State campus.

$50 per visit

Yes
 

Alison Gernand
Leigh Taylor - at lam5935@psu.edu or 814-867-5938
Nutritional Sciences (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00016189
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Inclusion Criteria:
Are a female 18-44 years old
Are generally healthy with normal blood pressure and BMI
Phase 1 - not pregnant
Phase 2 - are currently pregnant (22-32 weeks)

Exclusion Criteria:
Known allergy to iodine, shellfish, or corn
Currently have low or high blood pressure
Taking regular medication(s) prescribed by a physician
Phase 1 - pregnant or breastfeeding
Phase 2 - multiple/twin pregnancy
Food & Nutrition, Pregnancy & Infertility, Women's Health
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State College, PA ,

Habitual Diet and Avocado Trial

This study aims to evaluate the effect of providing one avocado per day for consumption over a six month period on established health parameters, including visceral adiposity, hepatic lipid content, markers of metabolic syndrome and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), compared to habitual diet.The primary aim of this study is to determine whether providing one avocado per day for consumption for six months will produce a greater decrease in visceral adiposity as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Americans with an increased waist circumference as compared to habitual diet.

Yes
 

Richard Legro
Erin Hammett - at ehammett@psu.edu or 717-531-1510
Obstetrics and Gynecology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
SITE00000366
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Inclusion Criteria:
>25 years of age
not currently eating >2 avocados per month
increased waist circumference (35+ inches for women, 40+ inches for men)

Exclusion Criteria:
does not eat or is allergic to avocados
not willing to undergo MRI scans
unstable medical conditions
lost/gained 10 or more pounds in past year
Food & Nutrition
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Hershey, PA ,

Understanding Prenatal Hydration Behaviors

To examine women’s self-reported pregnancy hydration behaviors, especially during a global pandemic. This study will also examine other lifestyle behaviors (e.g., weight gain, exercise, eating behaviors, sleep, pain management). It is hypothesized that hydration behaviors will decrease due to lifestyle changes related to the pandemic. Secondary outcomes will also be influenced by hydration behaviors and pandemic lifestyle changes.

No
 

Danielle Downs
Abigail Pauley - at amp34@psu.edu
Kinesiology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

Female
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00016174
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Inclusion Criteria:
Pregnant
Women
18-45
English speaking

Exclusion Criteria:
Non-pregnant
Men
Younger than 18
Non-English speaking
Food & Nutrition, Mental & Behavioral Health, Women's Health
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NASH AMPK Exercise Dosing (AMPED) Trial

The purpose of this trial is to test different levels of exercise needed to reduce liver fat in patients with NASH.

If you take part in this research, your major responsibilities will include: •Completing exercise sessions (if randomized to exercise group). A typical exercise session will include a 5 minutes warm-up with stretching, 15-45 minutes of brisk walking, jogging or recumbent bike and a 5-minute cool-down.

250.00

Yes
 

Jonathan Stine
Breianna Hummer-Bair - at stinelab@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717-531-0003, ext=320222
Medicine: Gastroenterology and Hepatology (HERSHEY)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is NOT accepting healthy volunteers
NCT04987879
STUDY00018280
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Inclusion Criteria:
Adults age >18 years
NASH diagnosis
BMI 25-45 kg/m2
sedentary lifestyle

Exclusion Criteria:
pregnancy
Active cardiac symptoms
Cancer that is active
Inability to provide informed consent
Other liver disease
Food & Nutrition, Digestive Systems & Liver Disease, Sports Medicine
Not applicable
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Hershey, PA ,

COVID-19: Implications for Family Meals

The purpose of this study is to gather information about family meals, what they look like, and how they have changed over time since the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants will complete a confidential online survey last approximately 10-15 minutes.

No
 

Hannah Mudrick
Hannah Mudrick - at hxm99@psu.edu or 717-948-6404
Behavioral Sciences and Education (HARRISBURG)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00015422
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Inclusion Criteria:
Adults age 18 and older
Adults who live in a household with a child under the age of 18
Adult who are fluent in English
Individuals who can read and respond to written closed and open-ended survey questions electronically
Individuals who live in the United States

Exclusion Criteria:
Individuals under the age of 18
Individuals who do not reside in a household with a child under the age of 18
Individuals who are not fluent in English
Individuals with poor reading comprehension or are otherwise limited in their ability to read and respond to survey questions.
Individuals who do not currently live in the United States
Food & Nutrition
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Observations of Family Mealtime Routines

The purpose of this study is to gather information about what family mealtimes look like for families with children between the ages of 3 and 8. Families will be asked to video record their family mealtime, in addition to answer some questions and to complete some questionnaires, some about body image and dieting.

On one occasion, your family's mealtime will be recorded via Zoom. You and your family will be asked some questions and to complete some questionnaires online.

$20

No
 

Hannah Mudrick
Hannah Mudrick - at hxm99@psu.edu or 717-948-6404
Behavioral Sciences and Education (HARRISBURG)
 

All
All
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00015339
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Inclusion Criteria:
At least one adult who is the caregiver of at least one child between age 3 and 8 (e.g., at least one parent-child dyad)
Adults age 18 and older
Children, ages 3-8
Individuals fluent in English

Exclusion Criteria:
Non-family members, as defined individually by each family
Caregivers who are under the age of 18
Individuals who are not fluent in English
Families without at least one child age 3 to 8
Children's Health, Food & Nutrition
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Home Observation of Meals and Environment (HOME) Bytes

This study aims to measure child eating behavior at home. Parents will video record their child eat 3 meals at home using a smart phone device and then take pictures of food storage locations (e.g., fridge, pantry). Videos will be coded for child eating behaviors. Parents will complete baseline and follow-up questionnaires. Children will wear an activity watch (like a Fitbit) for 1 week. In addition to these study procedures, there is an optional urine sample collection for children in order to study urinary metabolites as a marker of diet.

You will be asked to video record your child eating 3 meals at home and to take photos of food storage locations in your home (e.g., fridge, pantry).

$75 and an optional $25 for completing the urine sample collection

No
 

Alaina Pearce
Alaina Pearce - at homebytes@psu.edu
Nutritional Sciences (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
Younger than 18 years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00023102
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Inclusion Criteria:
Child must be of good health
Child must have no neurodevelopmental disorder (e.g., ADHD) or learning disabilities (e.g., dyslexia)
Child must not be taking any medications known to influence body weight, taste, food intake, behavior, or blood flow.
Child must be 7-10 years-old at enrollment
The child must speak English

Exclusion Criteria:
Child is not within the age requirements (< than 7 years old or > than 10 years-old at baseline).
Child is taking cold or allergy medication, or other medications known to influence cognitive function, taste, appetite, or blood flow.
Child has a learning disability, ADD/ADHD, language delays, autism or other neurological or psychological conditions.
Child has a pre-existing medical condition such as type I or type II diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, Cushing’s syndrome, Down’s syndrome, severe lactose intolerance, Prader-Willi syndrome, HIV, cancer, renal failure, or cerebral palsy.
Child has a highly restrictive diet limiting their ability to consume typical meals due to disordered eating (anorexia, RFID) or severe allergies.
Children's Health, Food & Nutrition
Not applicable
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Advancing the use of immersive virtual environments to study the effects of racism on eating behavior in an Asian American population

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have faced a rise in overt racism, with thousands of hate incidents reported. This has had a bigger impact on young Asian American adults, leading to emotional distress and health problems. A theory by Harrell suggests that experiencing racial discrimination can harm mental and physical well-being due to stress. Past studies have shown a connection between racial discrimination stress and health issues like obesity and mental disorders. However, there's a need to understand the cultural and emotional factors involved. This research aims to explore how racial discrimination affects Asian Americans' food choices by looking at stress responses and cultural influences. Using surveys, experiments, psychophysiology, and virtual reality, the study will investigate how cultural identity affects stress reactions and subsequent food decisions after racial discrimination experiences.

Hello,We are recruiting Asian Americans with Japanese, Chinese, or Korean heritage for a paid research study.We want to understand how racism affects food choice in a virtual reality (VR) environment. To participate in this study, you will need to complete an informed consent form, and answer questions prior to your arrival at the lab. You will have to come to the lab to watch a video of anti-Asian racism incidents that happened during the COVID-19 pandemic, and answer questions before and after the video. Last, you will make food choices in the VR environment. Participation will require three hours or more of fasting before arrival at the lab.You will be paid $25 in a gift card for your participation. If you come to the lab but do not complete the study, you will still be paid.Please continue to the next page to read the informed consent if you are interested in participating. If you are not, please exit this page.&lt;&lt;LINK TO REDCap SURVEY HERE&gt;&gt;

$25 gift card

Yes
 

Travis Masterson
Bianca Braga - at bqc5625@psu.edu
Nutritional Sciences (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
NCT00000000
STUDY00023365
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Inclusion Criteria:
Self-identified as Asian American of Japanese, Chinese or Korean heritage
Aged between 18 and 21 at the start of the study
Born in the US
Self-reported having fasted for at least 3 hours prior to the start of the study

Exclusion Criteria:
Not self-identified as Asian-American of Japan, China or Korea heritage
Not aged between 18 and 21 at the start of the study
Not born in the US
Self-reported having fasted for less than 3 hours prior to the start of the study
Has epilepsy or a cognitive disability
Food & Nutrition, Mental & Behavioral Health
Not applicable
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State College, PA ,

The effects of creatine supplementation on neurocognitive function of college students of differing levels and types of physical activity

This study design is a survey that collects information about students' active level and supplement use, with an emphasis on creatine. The difference between contact and non-contact athletes will be examined, in addition to people who are considered inactive/low activity. This will help provide information of how physical activity related supplementation use affects cognition in different populations, with varying amounts of neurotrauma.

All participants will complete a digital survey that provides information about their dietary supplementation and physical activity habits. As part of the survey, participants will be allowed to indicate their interest and availability to come to a laboratory setting to complete a brief batter of neurocognitive tests.

Yes
 

Semyon Slobounov
Bogdan Ivanov - at bmi5063@psu.edu or 617-327-4064
Kinesiology (UNIVERSITY PARK)
 

All
18 year(s) or older
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
STUDY00023261
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Inclusion Criteria:
18 years or older

Exclusion Criteria:
Under 18 years of age
Has had concussion in last 3 months
Food & Nutrition, Sports Medicine
Survey(s)
I'm interested
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State College, PA ,